Archived Posts October 2007 - Page 6 of 8 | Acton PowerBlog

Blog author: jspalink
Wednesday, October 10, 2007

Society is changing as economic freedom and diversification gradually creep into the Middle East. Dr. Samuel Gregg, director of research at the Acton Institute, explores the effects of free trade on nations including Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates and, in turn, the effect those nations are having on their neighbors.

The diversification of economies, notably the development of new products and services for export, allows nations to grow out of reliance on oil production as the main source of capital. The emerging economies create an entrepreneurial atmosphere open to all and encourages foreign investment. The result is a rise out of poverty and more open foreign relations.

Read the full commentary here.

Blog author: jballor
Wednesday, October 10, 2007

How’s this for an expression of un-Christian retributiveness?

If God wants to make my happiness complete, he will grant me the joy of seeing some six or seven of my enemies hanging from those trees. Before their death I shall, moved in my heart, forgive them all the wrong they did me in their lifetime. One must, it is true, forgive one’s enemies – but not before they have been hanged.

–Heinrich Heine, Gedanken und Überlegungen; quoted and translated in Freud, Civilization and its Discontents.

Read that quote within the context of these two related biblical texts, Genesis 4:23-24 and Matthew 18:21-23, and tell me what you think.

The justification for capital punishment isn’t that it is a necessary precondition for personal forgiveness.

Blog author: kschmiesing
Wednesday, October 10, 2007

I used to have more regular and extensive interaction with people whose worldviews were starkly different from my own. That’s not so much the case anymore, so it’s good to be reminded occasionally that some people live in different worlds that are sometimes hard to comprehend. That happened today when I came across an announcment for a conference, “The Secular Society and Its Enemies.” In the strange universe in which the conference’s organizers live, “The world is finally waking up to the dangers of religious faith,” “The American courts are stacked with judges who openly denigrate the nation’s vital and historic separation of church and state,” and “societies the world over face the ominous threat of de-secularization.”

Not meaning to be too flippant, I concede that the question of the relationship between government and religion is critical, especially in light of the advances of Islam around the world. But the conference description suggests that its agenda will be driven by the silly view that Islamic advocates of sharia and conservative American evangelicals and Pope Benedict XVI all have pretty much the same problem: they’re theocrats.

HT: James Kushiner at Mere Comments

Normally, I’m not a huge fan of Congressman John Dingell. But on this issue, I have to at least give him points for honesty:

Democrats took over Congress vowing to make global warming a top priority, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi planned to notch a quick victory with a bill that was long on political symbolism and cost, if short on actual emissions reductions.

Standing in her way has been Mr. Dingell. Much to the speaker’s consternation, the powerful chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee is insisting that any bill should actually accomplish something, and that its pain be borne by all Americans (rather than just his Detroit auto makers). In recent months he has been circulating his own proposals for hefty new taxes on energy, gasoline and homeowners–ideas that are already giving the rest of his party the willies.

His position arguably makes Mr. Dingell the lone honest broker in the global warming debate. But it also makes him a headache for all his Democratic friends, who’d prefer he just play political nice. For his part, the 81-year-old Dean of the House–as feisty and courtly and colorful a congressman as you’ll ever find–is unrepentant.

“I wasn’t sent down here to destitute [my district]. And I wasn’t sent down here to destitute anyone else. . . . I’ve got a responsibility to legislate, but I’ve got a responsibility to legislate well. I’m going to be honest with the American people about this and say ‘look here, fellas, this is what we’re going to have to do to you to fix global warming. You tell us whether you like it or not.’ “

Read the whole interview, and be sure to savor the ease with which Dingell talks of directly controlling or changing your life from his perch in the government. Honest, and frankly – chilling.

Sonny Bunch reviewed “The Call of the Entrepreneur” and discussed the significance of the American Film Renaissance (AFR) in The Weekly Standard. His article is titled, “The Right Stuff: Conservatives decide if you can’t beat Hollywood, join it.”

In his piece, Bunch discussed the goals of AFR:

AFR has been hosting film festivals across the country since 2004, but the Hubbards hope to set up permanent shop in Washington and push the festival into the mainstream. Jim Hubbard says he wants the name recognition of a Sundance or a Cannes while maintaining the political sensibility of Middle America.

Bunch also noted, “The Call of the Entrepreneur” is “alternately funny, moving, and educational.” Also, quoting Acton’s Michelle Muccio, Bunch declared:

“Hollywood demonizes entrepreneurship and business ventures,” Muccio told me before the show, pointing to examples like the evil Mr. Potter in It’s a Wonderful Life and the conniving Gordon Gekko from Wall Street. It’s not often that you see a businessman doing much good in a Hollywood film.

Blog author: eschansberg
Saturday, October 6, 2007

Well…except Goliath is mostly a good guy too– and he’s the one putting rocks in the air– and David got beat in this case by the government.

From yesterday’s (Louisville) Courier-Journal, Charlie White and Sara Cunningham report on the stand-off between homeowner David McCarty and the local Wal-Mart under construction in Lebanon, KY.

Complying with a court order, a Central Kentucky man yesterday ended his sit-down protest a few feet from a blasting site — part of the construction of a Wal-Mart development adjacent to his property. As dusk approached, David McCarty took refuge in his house just outside Lebanon before workers set off the dynamite near his back fence.

On Wednesday, weary from months of the nearby construction work and angry over what he said was damage to his property, McCarty had been determined to keep Wal-Mart from detonating the dynamite to make way for a water line…

The explosions occurred about 5 p.m., ending an exhausting couple of days for the family, whose members say they dealt with daily noise, dust and debris for about four months before deciding to take action…

The police couldn’t intervene in the stand-off because neither side is breaking the law, said Shelton Young, chief of the Lebanon Police Department.

“There was no legal basis for us to make him go in or stop (construction workers) from detonating,” Young said. “The homeowner was just as cordial and courteous as could be to the officers and to the Wal-Mart construction people. The workers weren’t aggressive either. We stayed for a couple hours to make sure everyone was keeping friendly and then we left.”…

The McCartys, who have lived at 2040 Campbellsville Road just outside the Lebanon city limits for 10 years, are now surrounded on all sides by the development.

“They are literally on an island in a sea of construction,” Spainhour said of his clients. “You can’t stand in his yard without getting covered in dust.”…

McCarty said he is eager to sell his property. “I want out of here,” he said in an interview late Wednesday night…he gave a quote for the land to Wal-Mart officials, but would not specify the amount. He acknowledged that the quote was more than the property is worth.

“It may not be worth it right now, but when the new Wal-Mart is up and running, it will be worth every penny,” he said.

Beyond an interesting story, economists would point to the “externalities” involved here. This is a case where one party causes damage– and benefit– to another party. Wal-Mart is damaging McCarty by lowering the value of his property in the short-term (e.g., he can’t sit in his back yard when they set off the dynamite) and helping him by enhancing the value of his property in the long-term (his land is worth much after a Wal-Mart is next door).

But in addition to Wal-Mart’s impact on McCarty, the latter can mess with the former– whether by sitting in his lawn chair or by demanding an artificially high price for his land (or going inside his house while they blow things up). Once Wal-Mart bought the property next to McCarty, he gained tremendous bargaining power over the company and the control of its land!

At least in theory, all of this could have been handled privately. I suspect that WalMart and McCarty could have reached a contractual agreement that was mutually beneficial. When that didn’t/couldn’t happen, the matter must be settled by some aspect of government. The police (as enforcement officers of the State) had no jurisdiction since no laws were being broken. So, it was left to a judge’s interpretation.

How hard did David and Goliath work to avoid the stand-off? It’s not reported. But in this case, a market solution was available before people started throwing stones.

(cross-posted on

Erika Andersen reviewed the “The Call of the Entrepreneur” for Human Events in a piece titled, “Entrepreneurship Preserves Life as We Know It.” The Call premiered last week to DC audiences at the E Street Cinema, as part of the Renaissance Film Festival.

In her article Andersen noted the international interest in the film:

Though it initially seems like the tale of the American dream, “The Call of the Entrepreneur” is an international story and is now being translated into Spanish and other languages. In fact, the film experienced its largest premier audience in Nairobi, Kenya with over 450 attendees.

Andersen also easily recognizes the importance of calling, or vocation, in business and in free markets:

The stories restore faith in entrepreneurs’ ability to build lives, strengthen nations and economies as well as fulfill God-given destinies. The film denounces the myth that capitalists are self serving, arguing rather that they are almost wholly devoted to others.

Human Events is one of the oldest modern conservative publications, and the one that President Ronald Reagan called his “favorite newspaper.”