Lessons in Liberty from a Little House on the Prairie

We could learn a lot about liberty from our pioneer forebears, argues Meghan Clyne. And an exemplar of this model of freedom and self-reliance can be found on our children’s bookshelves, in the Little House books of Laura Ingalls Wilder: Who in America’s past, then, can show us the way to a mature, sustainable democratic life — one defined not by the rebellious seizure of liberty, but by the consistent and wise exercise of it through a dedication to self-reliance? Continue Reading...

Two reviews of ‘Defending the Free Market’

Father Peter Preble, pastor of St. Michael Orthodox Church, and Stephen Kokx, adjunct professor of political science and RenewAmerica.com columnist, both recently reviewed Rev. Robert Sirico’s new book Defending the Free Market: The Moral Case for a Free Economy. Continue Reading...

The Religious Left’s Hunger for Big Government

“I was Hungry and You . . . Called your Congressman” is a good report from Kristin Rudolph over at the IRD blog. The article covers Bread for the World president David Beckmann’s comments to a group of “emergent Christians” in Washington D.C. Continue Reading...

Crushing the Entrepreneurial Spirit

I saw Joe Carter’s post on Entrepreneurship and Poverty earlier today, and it got me thinking back to a subject that has been nagging at me for quite a while. It seems to me that starting a business is simply too hard these days, and for rather artificial reasons. Continue Reading...

How Table Servers Advance God’s Kingdom

Brian Brenberg, a teacher of business and economics at The King’s College, explains why the work of “table servers” has eternal significance: Who is the “public” for your work—who is it for, and how does it affect the lives of those who engage with it? Continue Reading...

How soccer won’t decide the Euro crisis, but still matters

In what was dubbed the “Bailout Game” of the 2012 European Championships, the German national team defeated their Greek counterparts, the 4-2 score only slightly representative of the match’s one-sidedness. The adroit, disciplined Deutscher Fuβball-Bund owned 64% of the ball, prompting at least one economic retainment joke and the asking of the question: What does this game mean for Europe? Continue Reading...

Entrepreneurship, Poverty, and Abraham Kuyper

Joe Gorra of the Evangelical Philosophical Society concludes his excellent series of interviews with Acton University speakers by discussing entrepreneurship, poverty, and Abraham Kuyper with Peter Heslam: Gorra: The role of faith in building social capital is fascinating. Continue Reading...

Tomas Bogardus’ logical case for religious freedom

Need a logical defense of religious freedom? Look no further than First Things‘ “On the Square” web exclusive, where future University of St. Thomas assistant philosophy professor Tomas Bogardus tackles a proposed restriction of an idea long taken for granted in free countries. Continue Reading...