Archived Posts 2012 - Page 30 of 160 | Acton PowerBlog

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Christians, Let’s Honor the President
Russell D. Moore

We are going to disagree with the President on some (important) things; there will be other areas where we can work with the President. But whether in agreement or disagreement, we can honor. Honor doesn’t mean blanket endorsement.

3 Things the Church Can Learn from Election 2012
Trevin Wax, Kingdom People

There are a number of lessons that evangelicals can learn from failed strategies in the political arena.

A Referendum on ObamaCare and Liberty
Christopher DeMuth, Wall Street Journal

Without an immediate course change, the health-care law will become irreversible.

To Cure The Economic Hangover, Make Good Choices
Chuck Grimmett, AFF Doublethink

If we are going to make long-term change in this country, Allison says, we also need a change in our philosophical outlook.

Christian’s Library Press and Acton Institute announce the release of the first English translation of The Christian Family by Herman Bavinck.

When this book was first published in Dutch, marriage and the family were already weathering enormous changes, and that trend has not abated. Yet by God’s power the unchanging essence of marriage and the family remains proof, as Bavinck notes, that God’s “purpose with the human race has not yet been achieved.”

Accessible, thoroughly biblical, and astonishingly relevant, The Christian Family offers a mature and concise handling of the origins of marriage and family life along with the effects of sin on these institutions, an appraisal of historic Christian approaches, and an attempt to apply that theology.

Aptly reminding Christians that “the moral health of society depends on the health of family life,” Bavinck issues an evergreen challenge to God’s people: “Christians may not permit their conduct to be determined by the spirit of the age, but must focus on the requirement of God’s commandment.”

John Bolt, professor of Systematic Theology at Calvin Theological Seminary says this about Bavinck’s The Christian Family:

Whether the Republicans cry “fraud” or the Democrats scream “disenfranchised” we can be certain of one thing after the polls close: the President of the United States won’t be elected today. Even if there are no hanging chads or last minute court appeals, the election of the President won’t be made until December 13. That is, after all, the way the Founding Fathers designed the system to work.

Confused? Then it’s probably time for a brief refresher on the Electoral College:


Blog author: ehilton
Tuesday, November 6, 2012

I have been duped. I thought, along with my husband, that we were doing a good thing by raising our children in a household that valued traditional marriage and saw our children as gifts from God. I chose, for more than a decade, to work at home raising our children because I could not imagine a more important job during their formative years.

According to Laurie Shrage, I’m quite mistaken.

 Wives who perform unpaid caregiving and place their economic security in the hands of husbands, who may or may not be good breadwinners, often find their options for financial support severely constrained the longer they remain financially dependent. Decades of research on the feminization of poverty show that women who have children, whether married or not, are systematically disadvantaged when competing for good jobs. Marriage is neither a recipe for economic security nor responsible parenting.


In an essay for Big Questions Online, a site that examines questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, Rev. Robert Sirico considers whether morality is intrinsic to the free market:

Is a hammer intrinsically moral?

Your reply would most immediately be: “It depends on what it was used for. If employed to bash in the heads of people you do not like, the answer is no. If employed to help build a house for a homeless people, your answer might be yes. In either case, the precise answer is to say that the hammer is neither moral nor immoral; it is the person who chooses its use that can be evaluated morally.

Attending to these Big Questions will enable us to more deeply evaluate the economic organization of society. So the real issue here is not a financial one, but an anthropological one: What is man? Who am I? Why am I here? Where did I come from? Where am I going? What are my responsibilities to myself and others? How we answer these kinds of questions will have an enormous impact on every facet of our lives, including how we work and buy and sell, and how we believe such activities should be directed— in other words, on economics.

Read the rest of the article and join in the conversation at Big Questions Online.

Today is November 6th, and we’re supposedly going to elect a new President of the United State of America by the time Charles Krauthammer goes to bed early tomorrow morning. But for those of us who can’t help but think “big picture” every second of every day, what does November 7th look like – regardless of who wins? What about November 8th? How about a year from now?

Anyone who values liberty, limited government, and the free enterprise system knows that even if the more-conservative Mitt Romney wins, there are miles to go before we sleep.

Many miles, in fact. Like, as many miles as the Keystone Pipeline should have been.  Maybe even more.

My point here is  simple: the battle for the hearts and minds of my generation, and the ones that will follow, is still up in the air.  The tide away from planned economies and social engineering can still carry water with millions of impressionable minds. The arguments for economic freedom and de-centralization of power are compelling. When explained in straight-forward and interesting terms, they can stick in your head like a catchy TV ad jingle (just ask George Costanza).

One such example is nationally syndicated talk show host Dennis Prager’s 5-minute video-course at the “Prager University” website entitled “The Bigger the Government the Smaller the Citizen.”  Take a look by clicking here.

In Mere Christianity, C.S. Lewis writes that people “need to be reminded much more than they need to be instructed.”  Let’s remind each other of Prager’s mantra for the next four years (and beyond) no matter who wins this evening.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Why Should Christians Care to Vote?
Hugh Whelchel, Institute for Faith, Work & Economics

One way we answer the call to serve our communities is by voting. When we cast our vote, we contribute to the people and policies that will shape our communities and their ability to flourish or wither.

Principles for Voting
R.C. Sproul, Ligonier Ministries

As a Christian you have obligations opposed upon your conscience that in some sense other people don’t have, although they should have. And the first thing is this: You have to understand what a vote is.

Why Politicians Are Encouraged to ‘Flip Flop’
James R. Rogers, The Gospel Coalition

Ideological purity may be emotionally satisfying, but it typically doesn’t win a lot of elections.

Constantine’s Mixed Legacy
Fr. Raymond J. De Souza, National Post

How one views Constantine’s conversion and victory depends very much on how one thinks about Christendom.