Religious Liberty Does Not Require Us To Minimize Our Faith

Rabbi Meir Soloveichik, a professor at Yeshiva College in New York, says religious liberty does not mean we need to water down our beliefs in order to get along. Rather, he says that people of different faiths must learn to live as both “stranger and friend“: The rabbi explained that “America is the first country in a long time founded around an idea,” and that religious freedom “is the philosophical lynchpin of what lies at the heart of American ideals.” This theory is evident throughout American history, he said. Continue Reading...

Interview: Conversations on Orthodoxy

Back in January, I was interviewed for the podcast Conversations On Orthodoxy. After some wonderful editing, the interview has recently been posted. In particular, the focus of the interview is mostly on how I went from an American Evangelical upbringing to becoming a convert to the Orthodox Church. Continue Reading...

Progressivism’s Presuppositions

The more I read of Thomas Sowell’s latest book, Intellectuals and Race, the more I am persuaded that the era of progressivism may have been just as damaging to the history of black progress in American than the Jim Crow era. Continue Reading...

Michigan’s Universities Produce Entrepreneurs

According to the 2013 Mackinac Policy Conference, Michigan’s three largest universities (Michigan State, University of Michigan and Wayne State) are producing entrepreneurs at twice the national average. According to Michael Wayland, the report included: …responses from more than 40,000 of the 1.2 million alumni of the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Wayne State University. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 05.31.13

Poll: Most Americans Say Religion Is Losing Influence in U.S. Frank Newport, Gallup But 75% say American society would be better off if more Americans were religious Flourishing: The Way Things Ought To Be Hugh Whelchel, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics The Bible tells us that full shalom awaits God’s people at the end of this age, in the last chapter of redemptive history when Christ returns to consummate his kingdom. Continue Reading...

Chernobyl: Lessons From a Ghost Town

One of the four nuclear reactors that loom over Chernobyl Twenty-seven years have passed since the Ukrainian city of Chernobyl endured the worst nuclear power plant accident in history. In 2005, the United Nations predicted 4,000 people could eventually die from the radiation exposure, although different estimates exist. Continue Reading...

Augustine, Aquinas, and Fusionism

As I noted previously, I’ve been involved this month in a panel discussion over at Cato Unbound on the issue of “Conservative-Libertarian Fusionism.” My two most recent contributions to the discussion phase focus on possible resources for the question that can be gleaned from Augustine and Aquinas. Continue Reading...

The Fruits, the Roots, and the Soil

When we consider poverty alleviation, what areas should be focused on to yield effective and sustainable results? In the blog article, “The fruits, the roots, and the soil,” PovertyCure’s Mark Weber asserts that it is oftentimes the neglected aspects that are most necessary for long-term prosperity. Continue Reading...