Archived Posts September 2013 - Page 5 of 19 | Acton PowerBlog

poverty-and-womenThe latest census figures show that in the U.S. women are more likely to live in poverty than men, particularly if they’re raising families alone. In total, 14.5 percent of American women lived in poverty in 2012, compared to 11 percent of men. At every age women are more likely to be poor than men. Even girls under age 18 are slightly more likely to live in poverty than boys are. What could be causing this disparity?

As James Taranto explains, the difference can partially be explained by the advantages — biological, cultural, and legal — women have over men. For example, the reason why there are more girls than boys living in poverty is because girls are less likely to die than boys:

Acton On The AirSamuel Gregg made yet another radio appearance this morning in support of his latest book, Tea Party Catholic, this time on 570 WBKN in Youngstown, Ohio with host Dan Rivers. It was another fine discussion, and even included time for Sam to take a few calls from listeners. You can listen to the interview using the audio player below.

Blog author: ehilton
Tuesday, September 24, 2013

greek foodGreece is, economically, a mess. With a youth unemployment rate exceeding 65 percent, leaving two-thirds of the nation’s young people unable to find a job, there is not much to celebrate in a country where family life – like many cultures – revolves around meals. Greece is also facing a sharp decline in population. Here is a story of what happens when people who love to cook, but have no one to cook for, meet people who love to eat, but have little money for food. (more…)

Are you seeking scholarships to offset graduate school costs? Have you become acquainted with an emerging scholar and would like to recognize this individual by nominating him/her for a prestigious award? If you are involved in academia and have a passion for work that values rule of law, limited government, religious liberty, and freedom in economic life, we recommend you look into the Acton Institute’s scholarship programs. And we encourage you to do so quickly, for important deadlines are rapidly approaching!

Ranging from $500 to $1,000, Acton’s Calihan Academic Fellowships provide scholarships and research grants to seminarians and graduate students demonstrating outstanding academic work in theology, philosophy, economics, or related fields. The application deadline for the 2014 Spring Term is October 15, 2013. For more information on eligibility and to apply visit the Calihan Academic Fellowship page of the Acton website.

The Novak Award, named after distinguished American theologian Michael Novak, awards those scholars early in their academic career who demonstrate outstanding intellectual merit and new scholarly research concerning the relationship between religion, economic freedom, and the free and virtuous society. Professors, university faculty members, and other scholars may nominate qualified individuals for this $10,000 Award. Nominations for the 2014 Award must be submitted by November 15, 2013, and nominated individuals have until December 15, 2013 to submit applications. For nomination and eligibility information visit the Novak Award webpage.

For a complete list of Acton Institute scholarship programs visit the Student Awards and Scholarships page.

poorActon’s Director of Research, Samuel Gregg, offers some fresh thoughts on Pope Francis today at Crisis Magazine. Gregg points out that there has been much talk about “poverty” and the “poor” since the election of Pope Francis, but that this is nothing new in the Catholic Church.

…Francis isn’t the first to have used the phrase “a poor church of the poor.” It’s also been employed in a positive fashion by figures ranging from the father of liberation theology, Gustavo Gutiérrez, to critics of Marxist-versions of the same theology. In a 2011 meeting with German Catholic lay associations, for instance, Benedict XVI challenged the very wealthy—and notoriously bureaucratized—German Church to embrace poverty. By this, Benedict meant the Church detaching itself from “worldliness” in order to achieve “liberation from material and political burdens and privileges,” thereby breaking free of the institutional-maintenance mindset that plagues contemporary German Catholicism and opening itself “in a truly Christian way to the whole world.”


According to Investor’s Business Daily, over 300 businesses are cutting employee hours and jobs to avoid Obamacare. If employers restrict employee work hours to 30 per week, then they avoid Obamacare mandates for health insurance. Jed Graham of Investor’s Business Daily says, “Data also point to a record low workweek in low-wage industries.”

Casinos are one industry that exemply these cuts. In Grantville, Penn., the Hollywood Casino has told part-time workers they are now limited to no more than 30 hours a week. Gene Barr of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry had this to say:

Government has decided that you as a business will pay this if you meet a certain size. They’ve put these conditions on and of course companies will have to work around and with those conditions in order to make sure they can stay as a successful business. Businesses have to take the steps they can to keep themselves profitable and keep the people that are now employed employed.


Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, September 24, 2013

The silence of our friends – the extinction of Christianity in the Middle East
Ed West, The Spectator

The last month and a half has seen perhaps the worst anti-Christian violence in Egypt in seven centuries, with dozens of churches torched. Yet the western media has mainly focussed on army assaults on the Muslim Brotherhood, and no major political figure has said anything about the sectarian attacks.

The Perils of Liberal Moralism: On Syria and Thomas More
Carson Holloway, Public Discourse

Our president’s assumption that he should punish Syria for a moral, but not legal, transgression undermines international law.

U.S. House OKs religious liberty envoy
Tom Strode, Baptist Press

The U.S. House of Representatives has overwhelmingly approved a bill requiring appointment of a special envoy for the promotion of religious liberty in such countries as Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan and Syria.

What Does It Mean to Help the Poor?
Glenn Sunshine, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

What responsibilities does the state have to the poor? There are several biblical and historical underpinnings that can help us answer this question.