Archived Posts 2013 » Page 17 of 167 | Acton PowerBlog

TeaPartyCatholicSamuel Gregg’s latest, Tea Party Catholic, is now available for the Kindle. You can buy this version through Amazon, or if you prefer the paper version, visit TeaPartyCatholic.com

Robert P George, professor of jurisprudence at Princeton University says, “The book is as carefully and, indeed, rigorously argued as it is provocatively titled. It is a great resource for anyone—Catholic or not—who wants to know what the Church really teaches about the moral requirements of the socio-economic and political orders.”

If you haven’t already, take the Tea Party Catholic Quiz to see if you’re a tea party catholic.

Blog author: ehilton
posted by on Monday, November 25, 2013

respect freedomThe Catholic Dioceses of Pittsburgh and Erie, along with several nonprofit groups, have won a preliminary injunction against implementing the HHS mandate. U.S. District Judge Arthur J. Schwab granted an injunction in favor of these organizations.

The injunction allows them to continue to offer insurance that doesn’t include contraception, sterilization and abortion-inducing drugs while litigation continues. Without the injunction, the insurance administrators for the organizations — though not the dioceses themselves — would have had to start providing the coverage Jan. 1.

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Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, November 25, 2013

Judge Strikes Down Housing Tax Break for Pastors
Katelyn Beaty, Christianity Today

One of the most important tax breaks available to American pastors is unconstitutional.

C.S. Lewis: Scholar to the Common Man
Gracy Olmstead, The American Conservative

Some people have said C.S. Lewis sounds as if he’s talking “down” to his readers. But his style is only childish in the sense that it is grammatically simple.

Should High Schools Offer More Job Training?
Sophie Quinton, The Atlantic

Some states are rolling back high school graduation requirements to help prepare students who will enter the workforce after graduation.

That Hideous State
Joe Rigney, National Review

C. S. Lewis’s social critiques are more relevant than ever in the Age of Obama.

get-your-hands-dirtyAt the Values & Capitalism blog, Jacqueline Otto Isaacs reviews Jordan Ballor’s Get Your Hands Dirty. Isaacs explains how Ballor articulates a vision for the proper orientation for our lives:

In his recent release, “Get Your Hands Dirty,” Jordan Ballor of the Acton Institute lays out a clear case for why Christians ought to have rightly ordered lives and what that might look like. While the book took shape around a collection of essays, this message was as hard to miss as the bright orange cover itself. Having a rightly ordered, God-centered life allows us to be more efficient in our work and more effective as “salt and light” in our world. The title is derived from this call to “get involved deeply and meaningfully in the messiness of the world,” and also probably from Ballor’s affinity for quoting Mike Rowe of the Discovery Channel show Dirty Jobs, whose thoughts about work make several appearances throughout the book.

Ballor describes an ordinate life as one that is “rightly ordered relative to other loves, regards, and interests” (62). He illustrates in great depth the perspective that this type of life will give us in regard to our vocations. He also speaks about how institutions—namely the government— can have a negative effect on our work when they are out of their rightly ordered positions in our lives. “We need to put politics and political life in its proper place,” he says. “That is, we need to properly relate the political to everything else (culture, business, family, charity, church)” (206).

Read more . . .

One of the profound realities of theology and ecclesiastical enclaves in which American Christians live is each tribal subculture views the world as if Christianity begins and ends with their tribe. Evangelicals are a great example of this trend. Some evangelicals write as if they are the only Christians doing God’s work in the world.

For example, Joy Allmond recently wrote a perplexing article about New York City asking “Is New York City on the Brink of a Great Awakening?” Allmond, a web writer for the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, lives in Charlotte, NC, and after reading her article one is left wondering if Ms. Allmond is at all familiar with the religious and Christian landscape of New York City. The narrative she constructs for readers is that change is coming to New York City because evangelicals have arrived. The article begins with a factual impossibility:

20 years ago, Eric Metaxas knew practically every born again believer in Manhattan. “It was like a spiritual ghost town,” the cultural commentator, thought leader and author recalled. Yet, over the recent decades—particularly this last one—New York has seen a surge in evangelicalism. Some cultural experts believe the Big Apple to be on the brink of another ‘Great Awakening.’

I am not writing as an expert on Christianity in New York City, but there is no way Metaxas “practically” knew the thousands of “born again” believers in the Manhattan, especially among the black churches in Harlem and the Dominican churches in Washington Heights, and so on, in 1993. It is unclear why Allmond would make such a fanciful claim but it speaks to the tribal blind spot that some evangelicals have about their own importance. Allmond mentions several evidences of this hoped-for awakening, including the presence of Socrates In The City, The King’s College (where I’m employed), Redeemer Presbyterian Church, and Brooklyn Tabernacle, to name a few. While these do signal increased institutional movements in recent years among evangelicals, they do not suggest that anything spectacular is happening in America’s largest city. Are evangelicals really that important? Here’s why I say this: there have been Christians in this city faithfully preaching the Truth in word and deed for centuries before any church or institution named in Allmond’s article arrived.
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How easy is it for a 33 year old man to buy Plan B for his 15 year old “girlfriend?” Not too hard at all. In fact, the folks in this video from Students for Life don’t bat an eye – even when he makes it clear how old he is and how young his “girlfriend” is. Keep in mind that there is no state in the U.S. where it is legal for a 33 year old to have sexual relations with a 15 year old, and that Plan B cannot legally be purchased by a 15 year old.

 

I recently posted some thoughts at The Power Blog on “God’s Problem With Centralized Power”, which took a macro view of what I believe to be God’s clear disdain for mankind pursuing their own ends instead of His articulated purposes when it comes to how we organize ourselves communally. This time I want to highlight a specific, micro-level example of that same general idea.

The story of Israel’s demand for a king in I Samuel 8 contains so many relevant, interesting nuggets of insight that I’ve broken it into two parts. This first post will cover verses 1-9; the second one (on Monday) will explore verses 10-22.

When the elders of Israel come to Samuel on behalf of their people to ask for a king to lead them, the decentralized governing system of “judges” had largely been in place since the Hebrew people’s return from exile in Egypt (some 400 years). What the people were asking for was a massive break with a God-ordained system and time-tested tradition. It marks a major shift in the history of God’s chosen people and, truly, the history of God’s plan for salvation. (more…)

paying-taxesYesterday I was reading an article about Obamacare in the Washington Post. . .

Whether they know about that financial help is a different question, as many have had trouble using HealthCare.gov to figure out how much insurance would cost under the Affordable Care Act. And the study does not include information on whether those subsides would lead to lower premiums for shoppers buying in the health law’s new exchanges.

“There’s no question that when people get better coverage it is likely to mean that they are going to pay somewhat higher premiums,” Families USA executive director Ron Pollack said. “You don’t get anything for nothing. But if you’re eligible for subsides that are going to significantly reduce your premiums, that could more than make up for an increase in premium costs.”

. . . and then I repeatedly banged my head against the wall until I lost consciousness. Before I came to, I had this weird dream:

Uncle Sam: “Give me a hundred dollars.”

I.M. Citizen: “Why”

Uncle Sam: “I’m going to spend it on some things you need—and some stuff you don’t.”

I.M. Citizen: “I don’t really have a choice do I?”

Uncle Sam: “Not really, no.”

I.M. Citizen (reaches for wallet): “Well, okay, here is a hundred dollars . . . ”

Uncle Sam: “Wait, did you have to pay higher insurance premiums because of Obamacare?” (more…)

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, November 22, 2013

Pope Francis calls for full religious freedom in the Middle East
Cindy Wooden, Catholic Herald

After a two-hour private meeting today with the patriarchs and major archbishops of the Eastern Catholic churches, Pope Francis prayed for peace and full religious freedom throughout the Middle East.

Making Modernity Human: Can Christian humanism redeem an age of ideology?
Bradley J. Birzer, The Imaginative Conservative

“Humanism is a tradition of culture and ethics,” proclaimed the English historian Christopher Dawson, “founded on the study of humane letters.” The moment St. Paul quoted the Stoics in his mission to Athens—“In Him we move and live and have our being”— he bridged the humanist and Christian worlds.

We’re Losing The Two Things Tocqueville Said Mattered Most About American Democracy
Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry, The Federalist

In Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville doesn’t waste any time letting you know what impresses him most about America. To Tocqueville, equality and, to a slightly lesser — but very important — extent, religiosity, are the two foundations of the American experiment.

Getting a Job at Walmart Is Harder than Getting into Harvard
Daniel Gross, The Daily Beast

Despite pushback from the city council, Walmart will open its first two stores in D.C. next month. But getting a job there will prove difficult since the chain received 38 applications for each job opening.

An exceedingly honest woman called into an Austin, Texas, radio talk show, KLBJ, to discuss why she chooses not to work. She, her husband and three children rely on tax dollars for shelter, utilities and food. She admits that her parents did not work either, and that free money and programs were offered all the time. And what’s wrong with that?

Transforming Welfare: The Revival of American Charity

Transforming Welfare: The Revival of American Charity

By offering private alternatives to the failed welfare state, this collection of essays hopes to contribute to the restoration of an ethic that can be the foundation of a truly free and humane system of social assistance.
$4.00