Audio: Rev. Sirico on the air

Acton President Rev. Robert A. Sirico has been busy on the airwaves of late; here’s a roundup of his latest radio interviews: On September 19th, Rev. Sirico joined host Thaddeus Romansky on RED-C Catholic Radio in Waco and College Station, Texas to discuss the compatibility of social solidarity and free markets, and the interface of religion and economics more generally. Continue Reading...

The spiritual core of liberty

Last week FEE published an essay by economist Dierdre McCloskey titled “The Core of Liberty is Economic Liberty.” McCloskey writes, [E]conomic liberty is the liberty about which most ordinary people care. Continue Reading...

Commentary: The joy of spring

This week’s Acton Commentary is a meditation by the Dutch theologian Abraham Kuyper (1837-1920), reflecting on the significance of spring for our natural and spiritual lives. “So that bread may come forth from the earth” takes its point of departure from the lines of Psalm 104: “He causeth the grass to grow for the cattle, and herbs for the service of man: that he may bring forth bread out of the earth.” Pieces like this show another side of Kuyper than those that are often emphasized. Continue Reading...

Radio Free Acton: Victoria Coates on the art of democracy

In this edition of Radio Free Acton, we speak with cultural historian and author Victoria Coates on the capacity of democracy to inspire great works of art. Coates is the author of David’s Sling: The History of Democracy in Ten Works of Art, and spoke on the topic as part of the 2016 Acton Lecture Series. Continue Reading...

How did we get here?

In today’s Acton Commentary, I offer a brief reflection on the results of Election Day in the United States, “Politics, Character, and Competition.” I’ve heard a lot of wisdom and a lot of foolishness in the hours since the final results were announced. Continue Reading...

Why great men are almost always bad men

“Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely,” is the most famous quote by the English Catholic historian Sir John Dalberg-Acton. But what exactly did he mean by it? That particular quote comes from a letter to Bishop Creighton in which Lord Acton explains that historians should condemn murder, theft, and violence whether committed by an individual, the state, or the Church. Continue Reading...