Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'anthropology'

Pentecost Reimagined: How the Spirit Reveals New Economies

Pentecost Sunday: The Holy Spirit comes with tongues of fire and an “incendiary community” is empowered for mission. Pentecost is not the birth of the church. The church is conceived in the words and works of Jesus as he gathers followers and promises, “If any one is thirsty, let him come to me and drink. Continue Reading...

Workers and Laborers or Kings and Priests?

When faced with work that feels more like drudgery and toil than collaborative creative service, we are often encouraged to inject our situation with meaning, rather than recognize the inherent value and purpose in the work itself. Continue Reading...

Phantom Needs: Projecting Poverty Where It Doesn’t Exist

As we continue to encounter the adverse effects of certain forms of foreign aid and other misaligned efforts to alleviate poverty, it becomes increasingly clear that those in need require a level of care, concern, and discipleship not well suited to detached top-down “solutions.” But just as we ought to be careful about the types of solutions we create, we ought to give the same level of attentiveness to the needs themselves, which are no less complex and difficult to discern. Continue Reading...

Cooperation Makes Markets Thrive

In a recent piece for the Wall Street Journal, Emory economics professor Paul H. Rubin makes an interesting argument about the way economists tend to over-elevate and/or misconstrue the role of competition in the flourishing of markets. Continue Reading...

Civilization: A Christmas Miracle!

In my Christmas commentary this week, “Gratification and Civilization,” I examine the connection between making your kids wait until Christmas morning to open their presents and the development of civilization. Self-denial and self-sacrifice form the basis of human life together. Continue Reading...

ResearchLinks – 10.05.12

Call for Papers: “Economics, Christianity & The Crisis: Towards a New Architectonic Critique” The 2008 credit crisis is not only a crisis in economics, but also a crisis in the basic concepts and assumptions that underlie our thinking about economics, economics as a science. Continue Reading...

Whole Life Discipleship: Integrating Faith, Economics, and Work

I’m at the “Whole Life Discipleship: Integrating Faith, Economics, and Work” conference today at Regent University. As I have the opportunity today, I’ll blog (and tweet) some of the lectures. First up is Stephen Grabill of the Acton Institute, and here are some highlights: He focused on three basic questions: What is political and economic freedom? Continue Reading...