Posts tagged with: ave maria

Late last week, director of the Acton Institute’s Rome office spoke on Ave Maria’s Al Kresta in the Afternoon. Since the conclave to elect a new pope is set to start on Tues.  March 12, Jayabalan and Al Kresta discuss the potential candidates for pope and the mood in Rome. Jayabalan lists some of the qualifications the new pope should possess then suggests Cardinals from around the world who possess the best experience and skills.

Some of the Cardinals that Jayabalan and Kresta mention are:

  • Cardinal Angelo Scola, Archbishop of Milan.
  • Cardinal Marc Ouellet, prefect of the Congregation for Bishops and president of the Pontifical Commission for Latin America. He was previously archbishop of Quebec and primate of Canada.
  • Cardinal Odilo Scherer, Archbishop of São Paulo.
  • Cardinal George Pell, Archbishop of Sydney,
  • Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle, archpriest of the Church of Saint Felix of Cantalice at Centocelle and de facto Primate of the Philippines.
  • Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith, de facto primate of Sri Lanka.
  • Cardinal Raymond Leo Burke, current Cardinal Prefect of the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura. He was previously Archbishop of St. Louis
  • Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan, Archbishop of New York. He also currently serves as the President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and was granted the titular position as Cardinal Priest of Nostra Signora di Guadalupe a Monte Mario in Rome.
  • Cardinal O’Malley, Archbishop of Boston.

Listen to the full interview and hear the different qualifications of each of these Cardinals mentioned.

A large crowd packed into St. Cecilia Music Center in Grand Rapids yesterday to hear Rev. Robert A. Sirico’s presentation on “The Rise and Eventual Downfall of the Religious Left.” This is a political movement, he said, that “exalts social transformation over personal charity, and social activism above the need for evangelization of the human soul.” (He also took time to critique the Religious Right.)

An audio recording of Rev. Sirico’s Acton Lecture Series presentation is available on the Acton Web site here.

Rev. Sirico, president of the Acton Institute, began by pointing to a “series of signs” that often characterize the Religious Left today:

1) A tendency to believe that the Kingdom of God is not something essentially eschatological; it is a state of being that can and should be achieved on earth through human effort.

2) A loathing of the economically successful rooted in the assumption that wealth is generally unjustly acquired even and especially if it has been accumulated through market means.

3) A conviction that the cause of material inequality is due to injustice that must be rectified, usually by a forced redistribution of the wealth.

4) A reliable bias against commerce and the merchant classes, their products, their marketing, and their cultural presence.

5) A fixation on government programs that purport to do good for others and a pronounced preference for public policy (that is political) solutions instead of voluntary individual or communal efforts.

6) A judgment that unless physical states of social well being are realized, issues such as faith and morals are somehow invalidated.

7) An attachment to the idea that the natural environment represents a source of moral light in the world that is darkened by the activities of human beings.

Rev. Sirico will be discussing the Religious Left on Friday, March 14, on Ave Maria Radio at 4 p.m. with host Al Kresta. (The originally scheduled debate with Jim Wallis is being rescheduled at Wallis’ request). Pick up a live stream for Ave Maria Radio here. (Update: Audio of this interview is available for download in .mp3 format here.)

Blog author: jballor
Tuesday, August 1, 2006
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How many of you would like to live here?

Tom Monaghan has received a lot of attention for his plans to create a community in Florida in conjunction with the founding of a new Roman Catholic university: “The accompanying town will provide single- and multi-family housing in a wide range of styles and prices, along with commercial and office facilities to accommodate the businesses and organizations needed to support this major academic institution.”

Here’s what Katie Couric had to say in an interview with Monaghan about the town (MP3 audio here, RealMedia here, WindowsMedia here):

Some of the values, depending on your perspective… may be deemed wholesome, but in other ways, I think, people will see this community as eschewing diversity and promoting intolerance….Do you think the tenets of the community might result in de facto segregation as a result of some of the beliefs that are being espoused by the majority of the residents there?…You can understand how people would hear some of these things and be like, wow, this is really infringing on civil liberties and freedom of speech and right to privacy and all sorts of basic tenets that this country was founded on. Right?

David T. Koyzis gives “a (severely) qualified defence of the suburbs” here.

What are your thoughts about what might be called, “The New Suburbanism”?