Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'cameras'

Dehumanization and Punishment

Two of the things I’ve paid some attention to, one more recently and the other as an ongoing area of interest, came together in an Instapundit update yesterday. Glenn Reynolds linked to a video of a NYC cop who “threatens a man taking cell phone video with arrest.” This picks up the attention given here and here to the question of law enforcement and ‘citizen photojournalism.’ But what really struck me about this story was the threat attributed to the (apparent) cop, who said, “Guys in jail are going to rape you.” This is beyond the pale in myriad ways. Continue Reading...

Privacy and Public Persons

This week’s Acton Commentary from Rev. Gregory Jensen, “Finding the Balance: Privacy and the Civil Society,” is a thoughtful reflection on the place of privacy in our modern life. I have recently made the claim that public persons, such as police officers and politicians, have a somewhat different claim to privacy than private persons. Continue Reading...

On Cops and Cameras

Gizmodo has an intriguing post about attempts to regulate and even criminalize photography. As Wendy McIlroy reports, “In at least three states, it is now illegal to record any on-duty police officer.” She goes on to detail some of the exceptions and caveats, noting, The legal justification for arresting the “shooter” rests on existing wiretapping or eavesdropping laws, with statutes against obstructing law enforcement sometimes cited. Continue Reading...

The Future of Photojournalism

NPR profiles 'Afghan Girl' (1984) photographer Steve McCurry: 'McCurry's work has been featured in nearly every major magazine around the world, and he is undoubtedly one of the best living photographers in his field.'We’ve done a lot of thinking here at the PowerBlog on the future of journalism in a digital age. Continue Reading...