Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'carbon tax'

Big Oil Advocacy for Carbon Taxes

Today at The Federalist I explore “Why Big Oil Wants A Carbon Tax.” Perhaps such advocacy isn’t just made out of a sense of global citizenship and environmental stewardship. On the surface such advocacy may seem counter-intuitive. Continue Reading...

Carbon Regulation: Ecological Utopia or Economic Nightmare?

In this week’s Acton Commentary, I discuss whether the Environmental Protection Agency’s planned regulation of carbon emissions can be justified from a Christian perspective.  The EPA has found that carbon emissions endanger “public health and welfare,” and it is on track to begin regulating vehicle and power plant emissions. Continue Reading...

The New (Green) Robber Barons

What do you call titans of industry who influence governmental regulation to provide them with tax and subsidy incentives to make a business venture profitable? They used to be called robber barons…now apparently they’re “eco-millionaires.” The NYT piece gives a brief overview of four such figures: Bruce Khouri “did not found Solar Integrated until 2001 once tax and subsidy incentives made the market more attractive.” Pedro Moura Costa says he “saw the carbon market could be big business and the Kyoto Protocol confirmed my views.” According to David Scaysbrook, “tax breaks, subsidies and emissions caps had prompted even more conservative investors ‘to finally move off their perch.'” And “Neil Eckert, chief executive of Climate Exchange, which runs the main European exchange for carbon trading, has shares worth about 18 million pounds ($36 million). Continue Reading...

National Security and Energy Policy

Over at the Becker-Posner blog, the gentlemen consider the question, “Do National Security and Environmental Energy Policies Conflict?” (a topic also discussed here.) Becker predicts, “Driven by environmental and security concerns, more extensive government intervention in the supply and demand for energy are to be expected during the next few years in all economically important countries. Continue Reading...