Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'catholic church'

Chaput: The Next Pope and a Re-Formation

The historic resignation of Pope Benedict XVI continues to hold the world’s attention. The pope used yesterday’s Angelus address to say good-bye to throngs of well-wishers, while the Vatican announced today that the conclave to choose Benedict’s successor can begin as soon as March 15. Continue Reading...

Benedict XVI: Magnanimity in an Age of Self-Promotion

Since Benedict’s resignation we’ve been treated to almost two weeks of conspiracy mongering about the “real” reasons behind Pope Benedict XVI’s decision to step down. It’s been everything from Piers Morgan’s ceaseless yammering about his “doubts” to theories about the pope hiding out in the Vatican in fear of an arrest warrant issued by “unknown European” entities concerning clergy sexual misconduct, and still lingering hope among some that this time it really was the butler who did it. Continue Reading...

How to Become Pope

While most Catholics are likely to already be familiar with the process, my fellow Protestants will likely find this video on how the pope is selected to be helpful and informative. Continue Reading...

Vatican II and Religious Liberty

Of all the documents that came out of the Catholic Church’s Second Vatican Council, Dignitatis Humanae (Declaration on Religious Liberty) was, says Omar F.A. Gutierrez, the most revised, debated, and controversial. Continue Reading...

What Happened

It is clear that what President Barack Obama has achieved is historic: Being re-elected when not a single one of his major initiatives has enjoyed broad popular support. What is also clear is that the moral and spiritual demographics of the United States have changed considerably.  Continue Reading...

Samuel Gregg: Benedict XVI and the Pathologies of Religion

Over at Crisis Magazine, Acton Research Director Samuel Gregg has an analysis of a recent, and little noticed, article that Pope Benedict XVI published on, among other things, “the Relation of the Church to Non-Christian Religions.” Gregg writes: This message isn’t likely to be well-received among those who think religious pluralism is somehow an end in itself. Continue Reading...