Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'Christian philosophy'

Grace renews nature (even in politics)

“We see immediately that grace is inseparably connected with nature, that grace and nature belong together.” –Abraham Kuyper In their new book, One Nation Under God: A Christian Hope for American Politics, Bruce Ashford and Chris Pappalardo offer a robust vision of Christian political engagement, one that neither retreats from the world nor accommodates to its ideological whims. Continue Reading...

Martin Luther on Vocation and Serving Our Neighbors

“For Martin Luther, vocation is nothing less than the locus of the Christian life,” says Gene Edward Veith in this week’s Acton Commentary. “God works in and through vocation, but he does so by calling human beings to work in their vocations.” In Jesus Christ, who bore our sins and gives us new life in his resurrection, God saves us for eternal life. Continue Reading...

The Counterculture World Of Flannery O’Connor

Flannery O’Connor had a brilliant but short literary career. She died in 1964 at the age of 39 due to complications from lupus, yet managed to leave behind a legacy of keen insight into the human condition of sin, in ways some considered repulsive. Continue Reading...

Diversity Is The Basis of Society

In a recent review of Christena Cleveland’s Disunity in Christ: Uncovering the Hidden Forces that Keep Us Apart, Paul Louis Metzger wonders, “What leads people to associate with those who are similar, while distancing themselves from diverse others? Continue Reading...

Albert Mohler on Leadership, Stewardship, and the Sovereignty of God

In a recent post on leadership and stewardship, Albert Mohler argues that although “Christians are rightly and necessarily concerned about leadership,” we often exhibit a tendency to “aim no higher than secular standards and visions of leadership.” Instead, Mohler argues, the Christian is called to “convictional leadership,” something defined by fundamental Biblical beliefs that are “transformed into corporate action,” rather than a general deference to the status quo of secularist thinking: Out in the secular world, the horizon of leadership is often no more distant than the next quarterly report or board meeting. Continue Reading...