Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'encyclical'

EcoLinks 08.11.15

Pope declares Sept. 1 a ‘World Day of Prayer’ for the environment Rosie Scammell, Crux The Vatican on Monday announced a World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation, the latest move by Pope Francis to push environmental issues up the global agenda. Continue Reading...

EcoLinks 07.27.15

Apocalyptic and Utopian: On Pope Francis’ Bolivian Manifesto James V. Schall, S.J., The Catholic World Reporter The Holy Father is certainly against abortion, euthanasia, and population control. What seems unclear to many is how advisers who hold these practices necessary in view of theories of ecology are at all helpful to what the Pope is really after. Continue Reading...

EcoLinks 07.13.15

Excerpts from Pope Francis speech attacking global economic order Reuters Pope Francis made a sweeping speech on Thursday during his Latin American tour criticizing the global economic order and asking for forgiveness from indigenous peoples for crimes committed by the Church in the past…. Continue Reading...

Mark Tooley Gives Evangelical Perspective on the Encyclical

Mark Tooley, President of the Institute on Religion and Democracy, reacts to the recent encyclical from an evangelical perspective: The climate change issue is portrayed by the activists as being a moral issue and they put themselves forward as defenders of the oppressed and the poor around the world.  Continue Reading...

Samuel Gregg: Pope Francis’ Overreach Plagues the Encyclical

Samuel Gregg, director of research at the Acton Institute, recently wrote for The Federalist that the overreach by the Pope into a wide range of environmental issues plagues the text of the encyclical: Neither the pope nor the teaching authority he exercises is required to comment on every imaginable subject discussed in the public square, whether it is air-conditioning’s environmental impact, contemporary threats to plankton, the effect of synthetic agrotoxins on birds, or how dams affect animal migration (and, yes, all four are discussed in “Laudato Si”). Continue Reading...

EcoLinks 06.24.15

The problem with Pope Francis’ encyclical is that nature is nasty: Spengler David P. Goldman, Spengler The trouble with natural theology (the notion that nature itself points us to an understanding of the divine) is that nature herself is a nasty piece of work. Continue Reading...