Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'environment'

EcoLinks 07.02.15

Pope got some wrong, a little right Doug Bandow, National View The Vatican’s new papal encyclical on the environment is a highly political discussion of the theology of the environment. Pope Francis mixes heartfelt concern for ecology with an often limited or confused understanding of the problem of pollution and the meaning of markets. Continue Reading...

EcoLinks 07.01.15

Debate: Has the world improved in the last 60 years? Max Roser At the Oxford Martin School I debated with Anders Sandberg from Oxford’s Future of Humanity Institute and Robert Walker from the University’s Social Policy department whether we achieved to build a better world. Continue Reading...

Big Oil Advocacy for Carbon Taxes

Today at The Federalist I explore “Why Big Oil Wants A Carbon Tax.” Perhaps such advocacy isn’t just made out of a sense of global citizenship and environmental stewardship. On the surface such advocacy may seem counter-intuitive. Continue Reading...

Mark Tooley Gives Evangelical Perspective on the Encyclical

Mark Tooley, President of the Institute on Religion and Democracy, reacts to the recent encyclical from an evangelical perspective: The climate change issue is portrayed by the activists as being a moral issue and they put themselves forward as defenders of the oppressed and the poor around the world.  Continue Reading...

EcoLinks 06.25.15

Conservative Catholics Try to Domesticate Laudato Si Patricia Miller, Religion Dispatches Meanwhile, the response from the US leadership of the church to Francis’ urgent plea for action has been noticeably muted. Continue Reading...

Samuel Gregg: Pope Francis’ Overreach Plagues the Encyclical

Samuel Gregg, director of research at the Acton Institute, recently wrote for The Federalist that the overreach by the Pope into a wide range of environmental issues plagues the text of the encyclical: Neither the pope nor the teaching authority he exercises is required to comment on every imaginable subject discussed in the public square, whether it is air-conditioning’s environmental impact, contemporary threats to plankton, the effect of synthetic agrotoxins on birds, or how dams affect animal migration (and, yes, all four are discussed in “Laudato Si”). Continue Reading...

EcoLinks 06.24.15

The problem with Pope Francis’ encyclical is that nature is nasty: Spengler David P. Goldman, Spengler The trouble with natural theology (the notion that nature itself points us to an understanding of the divine) is that nature herself is a nasty piece of work. Continue Reading...

EcoLinks 06.23.15

Concerning the “Ecological” Path to Salvation James V. Schall, S.J., The Catholic World Report Whether or not we need church leaders also “believing” this ecological doctrine is probably not so clear. Continue Reading...

La encíclica es una caricatura del capitalismo

Francis X. Rocca’s Wall Street Journal article about Laudato Si’ has been translated into Spanish. Featured in Tuesday’s EcoLinks, this piece addresses many topics surrounding the new ecological encyclical, including the pope’s seeming condemnation of capitalism. Continue Reading...