Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'europe'

Radio Free Acton: Christian Democracy in America

On this edition of Radio Free Acton, Hunter Baker, Micah Watson, Paul Bonicelli and Jordan Ballor discuss the prospects for a Christian democratic political movement in the United States. Hunter Baker is a university fellow and associate professor of political science at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee. Continue Reading...

Audio: Acton Interview Roundup

We’ve had a burst of media activity this week; let’s round up some of Acton’s activity on the airwaves: Monday, February 15 Todd Huizinga, Acton’s Director of International Outreach, joined the FreedomWorks podcast to discuss his newly released book The New Totalitarian Temptation: Global Governance and the Crisis of Democracy in Europe. Continue Reading...

The predicament facing France (and the rest of Europe)

Pens are piled up as people hold a vigil at the Place de la Republique for victims of the terrorist attack on January 7, 2015 in Paris. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images “Dramatic events often focus our minds on the dilemmas we would prefer to ignore,” begins Samuel Gregg in a recent article for the Library of Law and Liberty. Continue Reading...

Audio: Samuel Gregg on The End of Europe

The recent terrorist attacks in Paris have again brought to the forefront discussions about problems of culture faced by both Europe and the United States. The attacks have complicated western responses to the Syrian refugee crisis, with concerns about the stated intentions of groups like ISIS to smuggle operatives into western nations among the legitimate refugees in order to carry out terror operations. Continue Reading...

European Flood: What Will The Damage Be?

No, it’s not a regular flood. It’s a flood of immigrants – some legal, some not. Europe is getting swamped; what’s the damage going to be? The American Interest reports that the Italian Coast Guard rescued almost 2,000 people over the weekend, bringing the number of immigrants to Italy this year alone to 90,000 (170,000 last year). Continue Reading...