Posts tagged with: interviews

MLK_PreachingActon Institute President and Co-founder Rev. Robert A. Sirico took to the airwaves in Detroit this morning with guest host Jason Vines on WJR Radio’s The Frank Beckmann Show to discuss the oft-overlooked fact that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was first and foremost a Christian pastor – the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

In many current day remembrances of King, his status as a Christian pastor seems to be downplayed or altogether ignored, instead portraying him as more of a generic “civil rights leader” – a more secularized version of the man. Sirico and Vines discuss King’s calling as a pastor, and examine what this secularized version of King says about the status of Christianity as a part of modern American culture.

The full interview is available via the audio player below.

Earlier today, Rev. Robert Sirico spoke with Fox News’ Lauren Green on ‘Spirited Debate’ about Pope Francis’ decision to excommunicate members of the Italian mafia. From Heard on Fox:

“Italy has become increasingly more secular and that has impacted the secularity of the mafia – they don’t have the kind of dramatic religious ties that they might have had at one time … the stuff of which movies portray,” said Sirico.

He added, “they [the mob] have an appearance of Godliness but really they are repudiating the power of Christianity.”

Sirico says the Pope’s actions symbolize his role as a pastor. “He is comforting those who are grieving the loss and are terrified … but he is also inviting the conversion of these people who are involved in these heinous crimes to repent for their sins.”

Watch the full interview below:

SpiritualDangerGreerPeterPeter Greer has spent his life doing good, from serving refugees in the Congo to leading HOPE International, a Christian-based network of microfinance institutions operating in 16 countries around the world. Yet as he argues in his latest book, The Spiritual Danger of Doing Good, “service and charity have a dark side.”

As a study from Fuller Seminary concluded, only one out of three biblical leaders finished well, despite the good they accomplished during their lifetimes. How can Christians avoid the spiritual dangers that persist in pursuing the good of our neighbors?

Greer’s book offers plenty of answers, and in an interview with On Call in Culture, he was kind enough to offer a glimpse.

As a young man, you noticed a certain brokenness in the aid industry—manipulation, phoniness, failure to uphold the dignity the human person. Yet you began to recognize these same traits within your own heart. Why does the position of the heart matter? Why isn’t it good enough to get busy?

In 2002, a volcano erupted in Congo. I went to help. Up high on a platform, I handed out blankets to refugees. And a photographer was snapping photos. But I wasn’t thinking about the refugees. My thought was: I can’t wait until people back home see these photos of me.

That moment helped me see how it’s possible to appear to be serving God but actually be making our service all about us. Unless we rediscover why we serve, our service can become a way to promote our image, heightening vanity and pride. (more…)