Posts tagged with: jay nordlinger

On October 29th, the Acton Institute was pleased to welcome author and National Review Senior Editor Jay Nordlinger to the Mark Murray Auditorium as part of the 2015 Acton Lecture Series. Nordlinger’s address shared the title of his latest book, Children of Monsters: An Inquiry into the Sons and Daughters of Dictators, which examines the varied fates of the children of some of the 20th century’s most notorious dictators. We’re pleased to present the video of Nordlinger’s talk here on the PowerBlog.

Jay Nordlinger speaks at the Acton Lecture Series

Jay Nordlinger speaks at the Acton Lecture Series

This week on Radio Free Acton, National Review Senior Editor Jay Nordlinger joins the podcast to talk about his latest book, Children of Monsters: An Inquiry Into the Sons and Daughters of Dictators, a book I enjoyed enough to create the “Radio Free Acton 5 Star Award of Excellence” in order to have an award to bestow upon it.

Nordlinger joined us here at Acton on October 29 to deliver an Acton Lecture Series address on that topic, and had some very nice things to say about our humble institute in his latest column on National Review Online (“The Acton Institute is a point of light, a jewel of Grand Rapids — and of America, and of conservatism”), even going so far as to refer to yours truly as a “wonderful Dutchman.” To this I can only respond: Thanks, Jay – the check is in the mail. And if you’re wondering, that is indeed Dutch hip-hop in the intro.

Regardless, the podcast is available for your enjoyment via the audio player below.

I promise not to belabor this point any further (well, unless something really juicy comes in…), but Jay Nordlinger, in the latest National Review, offers more observations [subscription needed] on the religious qualities of “secular” environmentalism, from his perch at Davos. Along the way, he cites my PowerBlog post from a couple weeks ago. The relevant passage:

In other words, you can contribute to an anti-global-warming fund in order to relieve your guilt at having used, for example, an airplane. I put this in Jacksonian terms (I mean Jesse, not Andrew): Don’t be emittin’ without remittin’. Later, Kevin Schmiesing of the Acton Institute will write that these remissions remind him of the indulgences of old, whereby you washed away your sins by your financial contributions. The notorious German friar Johann Tetzel (allegedly) said, “As soon a coin in coffer rings, the soul from purgatory springs.” (He was a rhymer too, at least in English translation.) And more than a few of us have described a certain kind of environmentalism as a modern religion.

The basic idea has gained traction at the top levels of the Catholic hierarchy, as this column by Cardinal George Pell of Sydney demonstrates. I must tip my hat to His Eminence, by the way, for introducing an important nuance: the most zealous promoters of global warming hysteria are not really “religious” in a Christian sense (that would give religion a bad name); they are more accurately described as “”superstitious.”