Posts tagged with: kindle

TeaPartyCatholicSamuel Gregg’s latest, Tea Party Catholic, is now available for the Kindle. You can buy this version through Amazon, or if you prefer the paper version, visit TeaPartyCatholic.com

Robert P George, professor of jurisprudence at Princeton University says, “The book is as carefully and, indeed, rigorously argued as it is provocatively titled. It is a great resource for anyone—Catholic or not—who wants to know what the Church really teaches about the moral requirements of the socio-economic and political orders.”

If you haven’t already, take the Tea Party Catholic Quiz to see if you’re a tea party catholic.

Creation Heart ManBeginning today, Acton is offering its first monograph on Eastern Orthodox Christian social thought at no cost through Amazon Kindle. Through Tues., Nov. 12, you can get your free digital copy of Creation and the Heart of Man: An Orthodox Christian Perspective on Environmentalism (Acton Institute, 2013). The print edition, which runs 91 pages, will be available later this month through the Acton Book Shop for $6. When the free eBook offer expires, Creation and the Heart of Man will be priced at $2.99 for the Kindle reader and free reading apps.

A summary of Creation and the Heart of Man:

Rooted in the Tradition of the Orthodox Church and its teaching on the relationship between God, humanity, and all creation, Fr. Michael Butler and Prof. Andrew Morriss offer a new contribution to Orthodox environmental theology. Too often policy recommendations from theologians and Church authorities have taken the form of pontifications, obscuring many important economic and public policy realities. The authors establish a framework for responsible engagement with environmental issues undergirded not only by Church teaching but also by sound economic analysis. Creation and the Heart of Man uniquely takes the discussion of Orthodox environmental ethics from abstract principles to thoughtful interaction with the concrete, sensitive to the inviolability of human dignity, the plight of the poor, and our common destiny of communion with God.

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Jeff Sandefer, co-author (with Rev. Robert Sirico) of the newly published book, A Field Guide for the Hero’s Journey, has been nominated for Business Professor of the Year by The Economist‘s Economic Intelligence Unit.

Sandefer, a lifelong entrepreneur, now uses his business acumen in teaching both business students and children. One of his adult students shared this about him:

Jeff has this insatiable thirst to build principled entrepreneurs and business leaders that I have never seen in anyone before. His passion to serve the community as well as the classroom is both contagious and inspiring. . . . As a student and alumni, I had my fair share of bumps, scrapes and humbling moments in class, but nothing has prepared me more than Acton and what Jeff instilled in us. The very tools I used in Jeff’s class is [sic] what I am using on a day-to-day basis as a leader and partner in a quickly growing international company.

The award, which comes with a $100,000 prize, requires a professor to be nominated by students. The long list of top nominees is shortened by a judging panel, and the four short-listed professors will engage in a live “teach-off” in March 2013.

Sandefer’s book, published by the Acton Institute, is available for free Kindle download until December 23, 2013, 3 a.m. EST.

Field Guide to the Hero's JourneyActon is offering a free Christmas gift: a free Kindle download of the new book, A Field Guide to the Hero’s Journey.  The book, co-authored by Jeff Sandefer and Rev. Robert Sirico, has been called a “the modern ‘how-to’ for entrepreneurs working on accomplishing big things” by Andreas Widmer, and is a terrific book not only for adults but for young people.

You can also listen to the authors discussing their collaboration on this book on this Radio Free Acton podcast. The book will be free on Amazon until Dec. 23 at 3 a.m. EST.

With health care moving back to center stage in Washington, we’re publishing Dr. Donald Condit’s Acton monograph A Prescription for Health Care Reform as a free eBook readable in a variety of formats. This excellent work continues to be available for $6 (paperback) in the Acton Bookshoppe.

For your free eBook, visit Acton’s Smashwords page. The Condit book will soon be available in the Kindle store (no charge for that, either) and in other eBook retail sites. We’ll keep you updated when they become available.

Via Smashwords, you can download digital versions of the 81-page health care monograph for eBook readers, smart phones and computer screens.

The monograph was released before the passage of the Patient Protection Act in March. Dr. Condit has recently authored an update in the November 2010 issue of the Linacre Quarterly, published by the Catholic Medical Association. The medical association has graciously offered readers of the Acton PowerBlog an open link to Dr. Condit’s new article, “Health-Care Counter-Reform.”

The Jan. 5 Acton commentary was based on the Linacre article. Read “Obamacare and the Threat to Human Dignity” by Dr. Donald Condit.

Blog author: brett.elder
posted by on Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Did you know that the NIV Stewardship Study Bible is available for Kindle, iPad and everywhere your smart phone goes? It’s true. Download this Bible for your Kindle emulator on your Mac, PC, smart phone, or directly to your eBook reader, and thousands of stewardship resources will be available at your fingertips. Or you can go to Apple’s bookstore and download the NIV Stewardship Study Bible for your viewing on your iDevice.

Want to start your year out on the right track? Download the YouVersion Bible app––the world’s most downloaded app––and subscribe to our topical reading plan on generosity. Read it daily on your mobile device in every major English translation and dozens of additional languages. Just 30 days will help you explore God’s Word; helping you grow in the grace of giving. Or perhaps you want to become a better steward of the environment? You can follow our 30 day reading plan for Creation’s Caretakers. A daily drip of Scripture will prompt you to be intentional in your high calling as God’s steward.

These are just a few ways the Stewardship Council is providing the most helpful Biblical stewardship resources for the global and mobile Church.

Blog author: jcouretas
posted by on Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Acton Institute has an eBook initiative underway and today we launch the first title on Amazon Kindle: Lester DeKoster’s “Work: The Meaning of Your Life.” Get yourself to the Kindle store to purchase this Christian’s Library Press work for $3.99 or to download a free sample.

Soon to be added to the Kindle store is Jordan Ballor’s Ecumenical Babel, now available in hardcover from the Acton Book Shoppe and Amazon.

Excerpt from “Work: The Meaning of Your Life” by Lester DeKoster (read his new Religion & Liberty profile here):

THE POWER

We know, as soon as reminded, that work spins the wheels of the world.

No work? Then nothing else either. Culture and civilization don’t just happen. They are made to happen, and to keep happening — by God the Holy Spirit, through our work.

Imagine that everyone quits working, right now! What happens? Civilized life quickly melts away. Food vanishes from the stores’ shelves, gas dries up at the pumps, streets are no longer patrolled, and fires burn themselves out. Communication and transportation services end, utilities go dead. Those who survive at all are soon huddled around campfires, sleeping in caves, clothed in raw animal hides.

The difference between barbarism and culture is, simply, work. One of the mystifying facts of history is why certain peoples do create progressive cultures while others lag behind. Whatever that explanation, the power lies in work.

An interesting thing, too: if all workers did quit, it would not make too much difference which quit first — front office, board room, assembly line, custodial staff…. Civilized living is so closely knit that when any pieces drop out the whole fabric begins to crumple. Let city sanitation workers go out this week and by next week streets are smothered in garbage. Give home-making mothers leave, and a lot of us suddenly go hungry and see our kids running wild. Civilization is so fragile that we either all hang together or, as Ben Franklin warned during the American Revolution, we all swing separately.

Incidentally, let’s not make the mistake, if ever we are tempted, of estimating the importance of our work, or of any kind of work, by the public esteem it enjoys. Up front types make news, but only workers create civilized life. The mosaic of culture, like all mosaics, derives its beauty from the contribution of each tiny bit.

Blog author: awilkinson
posted by on Thursday, March 26, 2009

It is our pleasure to welcome guest ramblings on the PowerBlog, and we are happy to feature this contribution from Alissa Wilkinson, who is editor of The Curator, associate editor of Comment, and on staff at International Arts Movement. She is finishing a M.A. in Humanities & Social Thought at New York University. She frequently contributes writing on culture and film to a number of publications, including Paste and Christianity Today.

In response to the question, “What form will journalism take in the age of new media?”, I have to consider two of my nearly-daily activities.

First, I work as an editor on two publications which are enabled by or adapting to the new media age. My work on Comment, an opinion journal published by the North American think tank Cardus, is predicated on both the internet and print. We publish a weekly online edition and a quarterly print journal, and we’ve been experimenting with social media such as Facebook as a way to advertise. My other magazine, The Curator, has no budget at all, which meant we had no choice but to start as an online journal. Our contributors – some quite well-versed in their field – work for free at present, and we publish weekly on the web.

The lesson I’ve learned there is that new media forces journalism to be either hyperlocal or (like my work) broad-based in its appeal, since visitors may be browsing the magazine down the hall or on the other side of the world. And as my friends and I have watched some more well-funded publications like Culture11 go under, we’ve remarked that publishing online with no budget has its benefits; you can’t really go under for lack of funds. And small magazines have never really made any money, have they?

Second, I purchased a Kindle a few weeks ago and have slowly come to believe that this little device may just save journalism completely. According to a recent article in Business Insider, it costs the New York Times about twice as much to print and deliver the newspaper as it would to send each of its subscribers a Kindle. Though it costs about the same to subscribe to magazines on the Kindle as it does in print (The New Yorker is $40 per year for the print edition, and $36 for the Kindle edition), because you’re paying $3 monthly instead of a lump sum, it feels like less. And the overhead for the magazine is obviously much less, since everything is delivered wirelessly.

For sheer efficiency and lack of overhead, the Kindle wins out: for flexibility, online publishing just works.