Posts tagged with: kishore jayabalan

Late last week, director of the Acton Institute’s Rome office spoke on Ave Maria’s Al Kresta in the Afternoon. Since the conclave to elect a new pope is set to start on Tues.  March 12, Jayabalan and Al Kresta discuss the potential candidates for pope and the mood in Rome. Jayabalan lists some of the qualifications the new pope should possess then suggests Cardinals from around the world who possess the best experience and skills.

Some of the Cardinals that Jayabalan and Kresta mention are:

  • Cardinal Angelo Scola, Archbishop of Milan.
  • Cardinal Marc Ouellet, prefect of the Congregation for Bishops and president of the Pontifical Commission for Latin America. He was previously archbishop of Quebec and primate of Canada.
  • Cardinal Odilo Scherer, Archbishop of São Paulo.
  • Cardinal George Pell, Archbishop of Sydney,
  • Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle, archpriest of the Church of Saint Felix of Cantalice at Centocelle and de facto Primate of the Philippines.
  • Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith, de facto primate of Sri Lanka.
  • Cardinal Raymond Leo Burke, current Cardinal Prefect of the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura. He was previously Archbishop of St. Louis
  • Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan, Archbishop of New York. He also currently serves as the President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and was granted the titular position as Cardinal Priest of Nostra Signora di Guadalupe a Monte Mario in Rome.
  • Cardinal O’Malley, Archbishop of Boston.

Listen to the full interview and hear the different qualifications of each of these Cardinals mentioned.

Update: Video Interview with Kishore from Rome.

Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith

Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith

As the world awaits the beginning of the conclave, many are looking at non European Cardinals as potentials for the next pope.  Channel News Asia points out that “68 per cent of the world’s Catholics currently from Latin America, Africa and Asia, there are increased calls for the next pope to be a non-European.”

They asked Kishore Jayabalan, director of Acton’s Rome Office, to offer his thoughts on non Europeans with potential to take over the papacy, specifically Cardinal Malcom Ranjith:

As a cardinal he’s very experienced, he’s been in two Vatican offices, very important ones. One for missionary activity and one for liturgical worship. He’s also been a Nuncio in Asia, in Indonesia and in Timor Leste. He’s done a very good job of managing the conflicts in Sri Lanka.

Read the entire article here.

Detroit News reporter Oralandar Brand-Williams interviewed Kishore Jayabalan, director of Acton’s Rome office, about preparations at the Vatican to elect a successor to Pope Benedict XVI. A date for the conclave, the assembly of cardinals that will elect the next pope, has not yet been set. Jayabalan said that there is no cause for concern. “They need to wait for all the voting cardinals to arrive before deciding on the date,” he told The News. “There’s a sense it’s better to take some time rather than rush it.”

The Italian news agency ANSA is reporting that “Hong Kong bishop John Tong Hon, one of the last cardinal electors set to come to Rome for the conclave, arrived in the Italian capital early on Wednesday.”

Read “Cardinals taking their time electing pope’s successor” by Oralandar Brand-Williams in The Detroit News.

This week, Istituto Acton Director Kishore Jayabalan joined Al Kresta of Ave Maria Radio to discuss the historic resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. The special broadcast featured Fr. Joseph Fessio, S.J., founder of Ignatius Press, who did his doctoral dissertation under then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger.

Click on the audio link below to listen.

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Seize the Day with Gus Lloyd on SiriusXM’s the Catholic Channel interviewed Kishore Jayabalan, director of the Acton Institute in Rome, regarding Pope Benedict XVI’s unexpected resignation.

Jayabalan discussed the mood in the Rome, the shock of the timing, and Pope Benedict XVI’s legacy.

Listen to the full interview here:

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Kishore Jayabalan, Director of Istituto Acton in Rome, gave an interview today with Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty regarding the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. While the pope cited his health as the reason he was stepping down, Jayabalan was asked if there were other contributing factors.

He does also talk about the pace of global media and politics and events today. So it’s also the circumstances that are surrounding his age and ill-health. I believe what he says, that the pace of the job and the pace of today’s modern-society communications make it very difficult for somebody who is not fully fit and fully capable of dealing with these fast changes. He feels like he has been left behind in some way, that he can’t effectively lead the church, and that there are probably many other cardinals out there, potential popes, who could do a better job.

Jayabalan believes Pope Benedict may return to his native Germany to write at the end of his papacy.

Read “Interview: Pope Felt ‘Left Behind’” at Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

The Markets, Culture, and Ethics Project’s Third International Colloquium on Christian Humanism in Economics and Business, “Free Markets with Solidarity and Sustainability: Facing the Challenge” conference is coming up this October 22-23 at the Catholic University of America in Washington DC. Academic conferences do not necessarily strive to be attractive or inviting (13 word titles and 13 letter words aren’t really all that “catchy”). But I would encourage anyone who is in the area or who is willing to make the trip to seriously consider attending this one. But why this conference? (more…)

The Detroit News editorial page today features Kishore Jayabalan’s commentary regarding the pro-business statement made by the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace (PCJP). Jayabalan, Director of Istituto Acton in Rome, says this:

It may be easier to describe the contents of the PCJP statement by saying what it is explicitly not. It is not a policy statement on the merits of financial regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley or the Tobin Tax. It is not a call-to-action to storm the barricades and “expropriate the expropriators,” the old Marxist term for an overthrow of the capitalists. And it is not a statement intended to discourage faithful Christians from engaging in the buying and selling of goods and services, as if these are grubby, disreputable but sometimes necessary ways to make a living.

It’s not quite a how-to manual for busy executives and managers who are struggling to live their faith in the workplace either, yet The Vocation of the Business Leader wants to encourage and inspire us to “see, judge, and act” wisely and prudently.

Read more….

 

Reporter Carol Glatz of the Catholic News Service has a story on the new Vatican document titled “Vocation of the Business Leader: A Reflection” aimed at educators, entrepreneurs and business people.

Glatz interviews Kishore Jayabalan, director of Acton’s Rome office, who praised the document for its pastoral approach:

“It’s trying to encourage and inspire business people” and prompt them to “think about how to incorporate their faith more into what they do,” Jayabalan told Catholic News Service. It shows that “it is possible to be a good Christian and a good businessman; they’re saying there’s no fundamental incompatibility,” he said.

Glatz also explains why the document was published and how its authors aimed for “a simple, concise primer that compiled key principles and aimed specifically at helping business schools form ethical leaders and at guiding business practices worldwide — from mom-and-pop store owners to corporate executives.”

Read “Can business lead to holiness? Promoting virtue in the executive suite” on CNS.

Download a copy of “Vocation of the Business Leader: A Reflection” by the Vatican’s Pontifical Council of Justice and Peace.

Does the Vatican think water should be ‘free’?” asked Kishore Jayabalan in his post examining the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace’s latest document on water. Although he is now the director of Istituto Acton, the Acton Institute’s Rome office, Jayabalan formerly worked for the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace as the lead policy analyst on sustainable development and arms control.

In his post, Jayabalan referenced the analysis of George McGraw, the Executive Director of DigDeep Right to Water Project, a human rights and development NGO headquartered in Los Angeles. Mr. McGraw asked if we’d be interested in providing a counter-argument from a conservative perspective, so we’ve decided to publish his response below:

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