Posts tagged with: Online Learning

AU Online’s four part series, Building a Marketplace Theology: From Conception to Execution of an Evangelistic Marketplace Practicum, begins tomorrow, January 22. Enrollment is now open.

Dave Doty, author of Eden’s Bridge, will be speaking on four key issues related to his book and experience. Doty spoke to PovertyCure about the book and the issues it raises.

My aim is to let marketplace Christians know that their vocational calling in the marketplace is ordained of God and that they have a vital role in His mission in the world, the missio Dei.

The natural extension of that, at least to me and given our calling to minister to the world, is to ask ourselves pointed questions: How does my vocation participate in Kingdom building? How do I clarify and enhance my role? How can I, even in my limited spheres, creatively address economic instabilities in the world by the use of my calling, skill sets, and knowledge?

You can read the entire interview at the PovertyCure blog.

What is the role of the marketplace in the Kingdom of God and in the redemptive process of God’s mission? Join David Doty, Founder and Executive Director of Eden’s Bridge, for an AU Online lecture series to discuss those questions. The Building a Marketplace Theology course is scheduled to begin Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 6:00pm EST.

David Doty will lead a discussion based largely on the book, Eden’s Bridge: The Marketplace in Creation and Mission, and material developed subsequent to its publication. The four online sessions will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:00-7:00pm EST January 22 through January 31, 2013. Visit auonline.acton.org for more information or to register.

Blog author: ken.larson
posted by on Tuesday, March 16, 2010

“…we are setting an ambitious goal: all students should graduate from high school prepared for college and a career – no matter who you are or where you come from.” – Barack Obama, Saturday Radio Address.

A few years ago I asked a friend and business owner why he put value on a college diploma when talking with entry level talent who had majored in subjects incredibly tangential to his job descriptions. He answered, “Well, it shows they can finish something.” That’s a pretty weak reason for a student and/or his family to lay out $50,000 to $250,000 of tuition and lost opportunity costs but I let him have his fantasy.

Former Heritage Foundation analyst Dan Lips lays out another kind of fantasy in National Review Online with a proposal to meet Obama’s goal in last weekend’s broadcast in light of the increasing cost of college in the U.S.. It’s a version of “virtual learning” accomplished online. That’s certainly not “college as we knew it” and not as it might or should be – a place where one seeks Truth and learns how to think – but maybe that education is unretrievable. Maybe all we can hope for are certificates of accomplishment in niche fields and employers like my friend.

Yet even with Lips’ online world, any bureaucracy including the academy deserves some closer inspection before we all jump on the web to search out our next degree. But this only makes sense if you agree with my premise that college has more of a role to play in one’s life than assuring a potential employer that you can “finish” something. Mr. Lips is rightly concerned about affordability – I’m thinking relevance. (more…)