Posts tagged with: podcast

Blog author: sstanley
Thursday, February 4, 2016
By

030620-N-7391W-007 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (Jun. 20, 2003) -- Cashier Sue Amine assists a customer at the Pearl Harbor Commissary, run by Defense Commissary Agency's (DeCA), in the new Pearl Harbor mall complex, which opened earlier this year. The current commissary sales floor is 29 percent larger than previous commissaries, with wider aisles to maneuver shopping carts and numerous registers to speed up checkout. DeCA's $22.8 million share of the Pearl Harbor mall was funded with surcharge dollars. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 2nd Class Jim Williams. (RELEASED)

Trading $ for groceries > Murdering people and stealing their food

It’s been said before, but it’s certainly worth saying again. Not only does the free market lead to material wealth, but it reduces violence.

On a recent episode of the podcast “Question of the Day,” co-host Stephen Dubner reads a question from a listener: Why haven’t humans evolved as a species away from aggression? Dubner and James Altucher deal with the question in a rather roundabout way. Altucher points out that, really, aggression has dropped for as long as we’ve recorded the data. Specifically, the percentage of violent deaths keeps declining. “As a species, we have been evolving passed aggression and I think a lot of that has to do with trade,” He says. “All these methods of trade have actually limited aggression because I no longer need to invade your country to get your resources. We can trade resources instead. And then it benefits us to be nice to each other.” (more…)

On this edition of Radio Free Acton, we talk with Marina Nemat – author, columnist, human rights advocate, and former political prisoner in her native Iran. Born in 1965, Nemat grew up in a country ruled by the Shah – Mohammad Reza Pahlavi – who ruled in a relatively liberal fashion compared to what was to follow after the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Nemat describes her youth and the changes that came after the revolution that led her to her time in the notorious Evin Prison. We also talk about how her experiences can shed light on our response to the problems that plague the world today: Islamic extremism, terrorism, and the Syrian refugee crisis.

You can listen to the podcast via the audio player below.

316853_288803591143707_552690558_nIn a recent episode of EconTalk, Russell Roberts chats with Acton Institute’s Michael Mattheson Miller about Poverty, Inc., the award-winning documentary on the challenges of poverty alleviation in the developing world.

The entire conversation is rich and varied, ranging from the ill effects of Western do-gooderism to the  dignity of work to the need for institutions of justice.

You can listen to the whole thing below:

Later in the episode, Miller discusses the need for us to reach beyond mere humanitarianism to a fuller expression of love, recognizing the dignity and capacity of every human person, as well as the full scope of human needs — material, social, spiritual, and otherwise: (more…)

Jay Nordlinger speaks at the Acton Lecture Series

Jay Nordlinger speaks at the Acton Lecture Series

This week on Radio Free Acton, National Review Senior Editor Jay Nordlinger joins the podcast to talk about his latest book, Children of Monsters: An Inquiry Into the Sons and Daughters of Dictators, a book I enjoyed enough to create the “Radio Free Acton 5 Star Award of Excellence” in order to have an award to bestow upon it.

Nordlinger joined us here at Acton on October 29 to deliver an Acton Lecture Series address on that topic, and had some very nice things to say about our humble institute in his latest column on National Review Online (“The Acton Institute is a point of light, a jewel of Grand Rapids — and of America, and of conservatism”), even going so far as to refer to yours truly as a “wonderful Dutchman.” To this I can only respond: Thanks, Jay – the check is in the mail. And if you’re wondering, that is indeed Dutch hip-hop in the intro.

Regardless, the podcast is available for your enjoyment via the audio player below.

51If4pLhXLL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_It’s always a pleasure when Arthur Brooks, President of the American Enterprise Institute, comes to town; he’s an engaging speaker, a thoughtful leader, and really an all around fantastic guy. That’s why it was such a privilege to sit down with him last week in the Acton Studios after he delivered his latest Acton Lecture Series Address last Thursday to record this week’s edition of Radio Free Acton. We talked about the message of conservatism, how it often gets bogged down in facts and statistics, and how conservatives can better communicate their core principles to a public that is often quite skeptical of our motivations.

You can listen to the podcast via the audio player below, and stay tuned to the PowerBlog for video of Brooks’ ALS address, which will be posted a bit later this week.

On this edition of Radio Free Acton, Acton Institute Director of Research Samuel Gregg and Director of International Outreach Todd Huizinga discuss the ongoing refugee crisis in Europe, the strain that the crisis is putting on the European Union, and what the likely long-term impact of the crisis will be. You can listen to the podcast via the audio player below.

Radio Free ActonThis week on Radio Free Acton, Michael Matheson Miller continues his conversation with David Bromwich, Sterling Professor of English at Yale University, on the thought of Edmund Burke. Bromwich is the author of The Intellectual Life of Edmund Burke, the first volume of what will be a two-volume intellectual biography of Burke. We kick off this portion of the conversation with some analysis of Burke’s position on free markets and crony capitalism..

To listen to Part 2 of Miller’s interview with Bromwich, use the audio player below; Part 1 is available here.