Posts tagged with: Pope Francis

Blog author: bwalker
Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Professors dialogue about the Pope’s encyclical
Courtney Becker, The Observer

“At the intersection of science and religion, you can’t just jump into any modern document and think that it can be taken entirely at face value,” [David Lodge, professor of biology and director of the Notre Dame Environmental Change Initiative]said. “You want to think about how the scientific community … might react to such a document. The history of the interaction between Christianity and science has been, to say the least, a little fraught on occasion.”

Red-Blue America: What should Americans have learned from Pope Francis?
Ben Boychuk, Duluth News Tribune

Pope Francis isn’t a politician, an economist or a climatologist. He is first and foremost a priest and a pastor of 1.2 billion Catholics worldwide. Americans, Catholic and Protestant alike, forget that too easily.
True, Pope Francis discusses politics, economics and the climate in confounding ways. He really doesn’t understand the way free markets work. He’s listening to some highly misguided people about global warming. And as his visit with Fidel Castro showed, Francis isn’t as outspoken in the face of tyranny as was his predecessor, Saint Pope John Paul II. But Francis is neither anti-American nor a Marxist. Some conservatives sound like fools when they accuse the pontiff of being something he’s not.

College professor will speak about Pope Francis at Wallingford Public Library
Mary Ellen Godin, Record-Journal

Francis has been criticized by those who deny the established science of human-caused climate change. Other critics have denounced the letter as akin to communism and anti-technology. Some conservative Roman Catholics view the encyclical as an interference with secular politics. “He’s not anti-science,” Bourgeois said. “Nobody is proposing we go back to the Stone Age; we can’t treat capital markets and technology as though they are going to solve all of our problems.”


Blog author: bwalker
Monday, September 28, 2015

Jeb Bush on Pope Francis’s Calls to Fight Climate Change: “He’s Not a Scientist”
Tina Nguyen, Vanity Fair

Bush dismissed the Pope’s words. “Put aside Pope Francis on the subject of any political conversation,” he said, before turning the subject back on his true nemesis, Barack Obama. “I oppose the president’s policy as it relates to climate change because it will destroy the ability to re-industrialize the country, to allow for people to get higher wage jobs, for people to rise up.”

U.N. chief: Listen to Pope Francis on climate action
Ban Ki-moon, CNN

Pope Francis, in his recent encyclical, clearly articulated that climate change is a moral issue, and one of the principal challenges facing humanity. He rightly cited the solid scientific consensus showing significant warming of the climate system, with most global warming in recent decades mainly a result of human activity. And he has emphasized the critical need to support the poorest and most vulnerable members of our human family from a crisis they did least to cause, but from which they suffer most.

Pope Francis Gives Catholics Permission To Be More Vocal About What They Already Know To Be True
Jeremy Deaton, ClimateProgress

When it comes to global warming, Pope Francis is meeting American Catholics where they are. An analysis from the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication conducted before the release of the pope’s encyclical found American Catholics are more likely than the general public to think climate change is happening. And, while fewer than half of non-Catholic Christians in the U.S. are worried about climate change, nearly two-thirds of American Catholics are concerned about the problem.American Catholics are also more likely to understand the scientific consensus around climate change and to support pro-climate policy than the American public at large. Hispanic Catholics are particularly likely to favor action to address climate change.


Blog author: bwalker
Friday, September 25, 2015

Pope Francis tells Congress: Be Courageous, Do Something about Climate Change
Zoe Schlanger, Newsweek

In his address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress Thursday morning, Pope Francis minced no words when it came to climate change. Referencing his recent influential encyclical on the environment, Laudato Si’, the pope called on the United States to make a “courageous and responsible effort” to “avert the most serious effects of the environmental deterioration caused by human activity.”

Pope’s climate push hits wall in Congress
Andrew Restuccia and Darren Goode, Politico

“There is no doubt that all of us are called to be good stewards of the environment,” said presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas). “The dispute is what the science and evidence demonstrate. That ultimately is a debate that should be had in the halls of Congress based on facts and based on evidence.”

As a scientist, is the pope dodging the biggest contributor to climate change?
Nsikan Akpan, PBS

Yet the Pope’s policy stops short of addressing a major contributor to man-made climate change: population control. “Every person that we add to the planet increases the greenhouse gases going into the atmosphere, so population growth is one of the great drivers of climate change, said Stanford University conservation biologist Paul Ehrlich. “If we keep the population growing, it seems highly likely that the climate problem will get totally out of control.”

A Social Scientist, a Climate Change Physicist, and Pope Francis Walk Into a Bar…
Francie Diep, Pacific Standard

The journal, which normally publishes physics and geology studies on global warming, is doing something unusual this week: It’s released a series of essays by social scientists analyzing and critiquing Pope Francis’ so-called “climate change encyclical.” The encyclical, formally titled “Laudato Si,” was released in June. In the text, Francis urges Catholics to act quickly on climate change out of a moral obligation to care for the Earth and the world’s poor, who are expected to bear the brunt of a warmer world’s ill effects. During his visit to the United States this week, Francis has re-iterated many of the encyclical’s points, saying things like, “It seems clear to me, also, that climate change is a problem that can no longer be left to a future generation.”

Pope Francis Starts U.S. Visit Addressing Climate Change
Brian Kahn, Climate Central

The remarks kick off a six-day visit to the U.S. — Pope Francis’s first time here — that includes speeches in front of a joint session of Congress and the United Nations General Assembly and highlight a continuing commitment to make climate change a central issue of his papacy.


Acton Institute President Rev. Robert A. Sirico had the privilege of attending the special joint session of Congress today as the guest of Michigan Representative Bill Huizenga; after Pope Francis’ address, he was asked for his take by Neil Cavuto on the Fox Business Channel; the video is available below. And of course, be sure to monitor our special page covering Laudeto Si’, the pope’s visit to the United States, and the news and perspectives surrounding his pontificate for all the latest developments.

Blog author: bwalker
Thursday, September 24, 2015

As Pope Francis Meets America, a Climate Science Scholar Offers a Fresh View of the Encyclical
Andrew C. Revkin, The New York Times

As Pope Francis gets into high gear on his visit to the United States, it’s worth reviewing details and contexts in the extraordinary message to Catholics and the rest of the planet in “On Care for Our Common Home,” the encyclical he issued earlier this year. The core message lies in a simple phrase in the poem he included: “The poor and the Earth are crying out.”

Robert F. Kennedy Jr: Pope’s Call to Tackle Climate Change ‘Is a Moral Imperative’
Stefanie Spear, EcoWatch

Herzenberg asked Kennedy what he thought of the political stance the Pope has been taking. Kennedy responded, “We have the ice caps melting, we have millions of environmental refugees, we have water supplies drying out, we have fires and floods and cities being inundated and it’s a crisis right now and what he is saying is that we need to treat this as the crisis that it is.

Even liberals think the Pope needs an economics lesson
Chris Matthews, Fortune

Certainly, many on the American left would agree with the Pope’s analysis, but there was one part of the text that rankled economists, even those who have long advocated for a concerted effort to combat climate change. Not only does the pope condemn modern capitalism as the cause of climate change. He also argues that market-based solutions to the problem will only exacerbate our reliance on an economic order that has caused major problems:


As the Pope’s address to the US Congress drew to a close, France 24 Television turned to Kishore Jayabalan, Director of Istituto Acton in Rome, for a reaction to Francis’ message. You can view his analysis below.

The pontificate of Pope Francis has inspired a great deal of discussion and analysis from the very beginning, and the discussion has only grown with the releases of Evangelii Gaudium and Laudeto Si’, his pastoral letter and first encyclical, respectively. Often that discussion becomes heated, and even angry, as various political or social factions attempt to claim Pope Francis as an advocate for their cause. From time to time it’s helpful to step back and have a calm, rational discussion about the Pope, and there are few more qualified to engage in such a discussion than Al Kresta and Acton Institue Director of Research Samuel Gregg. Sam joined Al on Ave Maria Radio’s Kresta In The Afternoon on Tuesday to provide some context and analysis for Pope Francis’ visit to the United States, and also provides some solid guidelines on what types of issues faithful catholics must assent to church teaching on, and other types of issues that allow for a wide range of prudential debate.

It’s our pleasure to share this interview with you via the audio player below.