Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'Poverty in the United States'

7 Figures: Income and poverty in the U.S.

Yesterday the U.S. Census Bureau released its latest report on income and poverty in the United States. Here are seven figures from the report you should know about: 1. Real median household income increased 5.2 percent between 2014 and 2015—from $53,700 to $56,500. Continue Reading...

Hunger in America is on the decline

In policy and social science hunger is defined as a condition in which a person, for a sustained period, is unable to eat sufficient food to meet basic nutritional needs. While the vast majority of people who suffer from hunger live in developing countries, far too many people in America also suffer from hunger. Continue Reading...

Why Poverty Figures Can Be Misleading

What if told you that between 90-100 percent of Americans are living in “healthcare poverty.” You would probably object and say that while the country certainly has a healthcare crisis, my numbers are surely inflated. Continue Reading...

How We Tax the Poor

Imagine you’re a single mom with one child who receives $19,300 a year in government benefits. A local business offers to hire you full-time at an hourly rate of $15 an hour. Continue Reading...

7 Figures: Hunger in America

Feeding America is a nationwide network of 200 member food banks, the largest domestic hunger-relief charity in the United States. The Feeding America network of food banks provides food assistance to an estimated 46.5 million Americans in need each year, including 12 million children and 7 million seniors. Continue Reading...

We Don’t Have a Poverty Problem, We Have a Dependency Problem

“There is no material poverty in the U.S.,” says the always-provocative Walter E. Williams. “What we have in our nation are dependency and poverty of the spirit, with people making unwise choices and leading pathological lives aided and abetted by the welfare state.” The Census Bureau pegs the poverty rate among blacks at 35 percent and among whites at 13 percent. Continue Reading...

Samuel Gregg: Who’s Really Forgotten the Poor

On National Review Online, Acton Research Director Samuel Gregg offers an analysis of last night’s debate between President Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney. Gregg begins with the assertion by Melinda Henneberger of the Washington Post that the candidates are ignoring poor and working-class Americans. Continue Reading...