Posts tagged with: radio

Acton’s Director of International Outreach Todd Huizinga has been quite busy since the release of his book The New Totalitarian Temptation: Global Governance and the Crisis of Democracy in EuropeLast week Thursday, he continued to talk about this topic in an Acton Lecture Series address that we’re pleased to share with you today on the PowerBlog. Additionally, we’ve posted audio of Todd’s hour-long appearance last night on WBZ Boston’s “Nightside” show with host Dan Rea after the jump.

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Acton Institute Director of Research Samuel Gregg joins host Drew Mariani on Relevant Radio’s The Drew Mariani Show to discuss the important issue of conscience: what is it, and how should Roman Catholics in particular approach difficult moral issues in their day to day life? You can listen to the interview via the audio player below.

The pontificate of Pope Francis has inspired a great deal of discussion and analysis from the very beginning, and the discussion has only grown with the releases of Evangelii Gaudium and Laudeto Si’, his pastoral letter and first encyclical, respectively. Often that discussion becomes heated, and even angry, as various political or social factions attempt to claim Pope Francis as an advocate for their cause. From time to time it’s helpful to step back and have a calm, rational discussion about the Pope, and there are few more qualified to engage in such a discussion than Al Kresta and Acton Institue Director of Research Samuel Gregg. Sam joined Al on Ave Maria Radio’s Kresta In The Afternoon on Tuesday to provide some context and analysis for Pope Francis’ visit to the United States, and also provides some solid guidelines on what types of issues faithful catholics must assent to church teaching on, and other types of issues that allow for a wide range of prudential debate.

It’s our pleasure to share this interview with you via the audio player below.

Acton Institute President Rev. Robert A. Sirico joined host Laura Ingraham on The Laura Ingraham Show while stuck in Washington, D.C. traffic resulting from the arrival of Pope Francis in the city. They discussed the the optics of the Pope’s arrival at the White House, his comments there, and what to expect as the Pope addresses Congress tomorrow morning.

We’ve posted the audio of the interview below; our thanks to The Laura Ingraham Show for the kind permission to share this audio with you.

Acton Institute External Relations Officer Peter Johnson wrote recently at The Federalist that “If Francis can imagine a way to affirm my generation’s devotion to the marginalized while delivering a stern warning against the sort of degenerate sentimentality and paternalism that advocating for the poor can engender, then I think Francis could have an astounding impact here.” He’s been called upon a number of times now to share his thoughts on this topic on a variety of podcasts, and we’d like to highlight a couple of interviews here.

First of all, Peter appeared on the Larry Conners USA program to discuss his article; the interview is available in full below.

Peter also made an appearance on the Cam & Co. podcast on NRA News, which you can listen to below.

Pope Francis has described himself as having an “a great allergy to economic things,” admitting that he doesn’t understand it very well. Does this “allergy” cause him to miss the good that the market economy has done and can continue to do for the world’s poor?

Acton Institute Director of Research Samuel Gregg examined that question today with host Hoppy Kercheval on Talkline on the West Virginia MetroNews radio network. Gregg discusses the impact that the market economy has had in cutting poverty rates worldwide in recent decades, and looks at the Pope’s statements on the market in light of his experience of a corrupt market economy in Argentina. You can listen to the interview via the audio player below.

Acton Institute President Rev. Robert A. Sirico was interviewed recently for a story on WHYY FM in Philadelphia discussing the Pope’s upcoming trip to the city, and focusing on the impact of his encyclical Laudato Si’ within the Catholic Church. Sirico points out that while the Pope is correct to urge Christians to be responsible stewards of God’s creation, the inclusion of specific policy proposals on climate may prove to be unwise in the long run.

You can listen to the full interview via the audio player below.