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Posts tagged with: socialism

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Antonio Gramsci (1922)

In a new article, “The Most Dangerous Socialist in History,” written for The Stream by Acton Institute’s Research Director Samuel Gregg, a socialist ideology running rampant throughout culture today is unveiled. The thoughts of Antonio Gramsci, “an Italian philosopher, journalist and Communist official who spent the last 11 years of his life in Mussolini’s prisons” are eating away at institutions today, calling for university departments and journalism schools to reveal the capitalist rule and “hidden structures of privilege.” Unfortunately, this idea proves “tougher to dismantle than the crude cement blocks of the old Berlin Wall.”

Gregg points out to his readers that Marx and Lenin previously thought that different religions and cultural institutions were mere distractions presented to hide the power wielded by capitalists with tight grips on money and power. According to this Marxist theory, the dismantling of false religion would take place after capitalism was squashed. Gramsci, however, thought that it was through voice of art, literature and education that power was gained and therefore socialist thought should be filtered. Gramsci’s writings called for leftist control of prominent cultural institutions, proposing rhetoric difficult to fight. Gramsci’s ideas are alive today, posing threats to liberty: (more…)

almsDavid Schelhaas, Professor Emeritus of English at Dordt College, recently published an article titled “What Does Social Democrat Mean?” Schelhaas suggests that “Christians should seriously consider the merits of social democracy.” Schelhaas is quick to point out that he does not advocate socialism, with state control and management of the means of production, coupled with the redistribution of wealth. Instead, he advocates for the lighter “social democracy.”

Schelhaas goes on to outline his vision of social democracy, including the state’s role in “creating a good and just society” and “using taxes to pay for…other social changes they desire.” His chief concern is wealth inequality, and claims it is the underlying cause of “virtually all social problems that plague a society, things like infant mortality, life expectancy, criminality, mental illness, etc.”

(more…)

Wikipedia

Wikipedia

“Having a heart for the poor isn’t hard. Having a mind for the poor…that’s the challenge.” –Poverty, Inc.

This quote from the documentary Poverty, Inc. highlights the reason why so many people are willing to give their money to foreign aid, without necessarily understanding its harmful effects.  This quote can also shed some light on the recent embrace of socialism by many millennials.

When young people look at the rate of poverty in the U.S. and see that we are not doing as well as  some other developed countries, it is easy for them to place this blame on what they believe is “capitalism.”  If capitalism has caused the U.S. to experience this poverty then it logically follows that people today, especially millennials, would embrace socialism instead of capitalism.

Given that I am a millennial myself, this makes sense to me.  It’s clear that we care about these causes and that we are willing to give our time and money.  That’s the easy part.  We have a heart for the poor. The challenge is having a mind for the poor. (more…)

Samuel Gregg, Director of Research at the Acton Institute and author of For God And Profit: How Banking and Finance Can Serve the Common Good, joins host Drew Mariani on Relevant Radio’s The Drew Mariani Show to discuss the recent failed referendum in Switzerland that would have provided a guaranteed basic income to all citizens, and how that vote reflects the limitations of social democracy.

You can listen to the full interview via the audio player below.

venezuela-food-shortagesThe Venezuelan economy is buckling under the weight of its severe socialist policies, and even as its president admits to a nationwide economic emergency, the government continues to affirm the drivers behind the collapse, blaming low oil prices and global capitalism instead.

This was supposed to be the dawn of “21st-century socialism,” as the late President Hugo Chavez proclaimed over 10 years ago, complete with the right tweaks and upgrades to its materialistic, mechanistic approach to the human person. “We have assumed the commitment to direct the Bolivarian Revolution towards socialism,” he said, “and to contribute to the socialist path, with a new socialism…which is based in solidarity, in fraternity, in love, in justice, in liberty, and in equality.”

Alas, with a shrinking economy, booming inflation, violent outbreaks, and empty food shelves, “21st-century socialism” is feeling mighty nostalgic in all the wrong ways.

In the years before Chavez, the country was in better shape than much of the continent. Now, thanks to the temptations of centralized power, the arrogance of centralized planners, and a series of faux upgrades to age-old bad ideas, the nation is crumbling. The oil prices simply served as the messenger. (more…)

In an era where socialism is (inexplicably) once again in vogue, we should ask, “What would life be like in a world without capitalism?”

The Fund for American Studies has produced a superb It’s a Wonderful Life-style video that not only shows what life would be like if we banned free enterprise (i.e., a lot like Soviet Russia) but also makes the point that when you lose economic freedom you lose other freedoms too. As the angel says, “When you take away the carrot, all you’re left with is the stick.

My favorite part of the video:

Anti-capitalist activist: “I just wanted to get rid of the greed. I didn’t want to get rid of my microwave, my air-conditioner. . . ”

Angel: “Your Xbox.”

Activist: “My Xbox is gone?”

Angel: “Yeah, well, in this world that greedy Bill Gates work in a bowling ball factory in Akron. Lose-win, right?”


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Well, it finally happened. The pope felt the Bern.

Against expectations, Pope Francis and  Senator Bernie Sanders, the Democrat candidate for U.S. president, met privately today in the Vatican hotel where the pontiff resides and where Sanders was staying as a guest.

Bernie Sanders was in Rome for the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences meeting to discuss his economic, environmental and moral concerns (as summed up in Sanders’own words during the press scrum that followed).

The Pontifical Academy’s meeting was dedicated to the 25th anniversary of John Paul II’s Centisimus Annus, arguably the most pro-market  encyclical in the history of Catholic social teaching published in 1991 on the 100th anniversary of Leo XIII’s 1891 encyclical Rerum Novarum which also praised private property rights, the value of personal liberty, and likewise denounced Marxism on grounds of mistaken anthropology.

Sanders put his own socialist spin on Centesimus Annus while in Rome. (more…)