Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'STARBUCKS CORPORATION'

Neil Young, Starbucks and the War on GMOs

Our religious shareholder activist buddies in As You Sow and the Interfaith Center for Corporate Responsibility can welcome Neil Young in their ill-advised battle against genetically modified organisms. Seems ol’ Shakey – as Young is known to his friends, family and hardcore fans – has released a song that could’ve been written from all the GMO falsehoods and scare tactics spread by AYS and ICCR, including: More than 60 percent of all processed foods available today contain GE ingredients such as soy, corn, or canola; and because in the U.S. Continue Reading...

New Report: Orthodox Monastic Communities in the United States

The Assembly of Canonical Orthodox Bishops of North and Central America has published a new report on Orthodox Monastic Communities in the United States (here). The report contains a lot of great information (“great” for nerds like me, anyway), including a whole section entitled, “‘Monastic Economy:’ Ownership of Property and Sources of Income in US Orthodox Monasteries.” According to the report, In summary, the three most common sources of income in US Orthodox monasteries are: Occasional private donations including bequests and offerings for performed sacraments (87% of all monastic communities mentioned this source of income); Sale of religious items (except candles) that are not produced by monastery (52% of all monastic communities mentioned this source of income); Production and sales of candles (24% of all monastic communities mentioned this source of income). Continue Reading...

Business Without Religious Liberty: Where Profit Is King

The Obama administration and several courts have effectively said that religious freedom doesn’t apply to money-makers — at least, not when it comes to purchasing abortion-inducing drugs for your employees. In a recent piece for USA Today, Mark Rienzi, author of a marvelous paper on the relationship between profit-making and religious liberty, argues that drawing the line on “for-profit” vs. Continue Reading...