Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'technology'

Some Thoughts on Social Media and Publishing

After hearing about an established Christian publisher recently launching an official blog for their products, I did some thinking about the relationship between the traditional publication outlets and social media. I’m sure that traditional publishers have a relatively large budget for print advertising, but it seems that they are very slow to hire professionals to do serious social media work, blogging, and online advertising. Continue Reading...

The Future of Photojournalism

NPR profiles 'Afghan Girl' (1984) photographer Steve McCurry: 'McCurry's work has been featured in nearly every major magazine around the world, and he is undoubtedly one of the best living photographers in his field.'We’ve done a lot of thinking here at the PowerBlog on the future of journalism in a digital age. Continue Reading...

Acton USB Flash Drive

The Acton Institute is branching out into the technology sector with its new Acton branded flash drives. We initially offered these drives to attendees of Acton University where they were received with cheers from bloggers and others who still remember—with a shudder—the horrors of the old 3½ floppies (remember the good old “tape hack” you could use to trick your computer into thinking that it was a DD and not an HD disk?) and even the ginormous 5¼ floppies. Continue Reading...

Toward a Theological Ethic for Internet Discourse

The relationship of the Christian church and the broader culture has been a perennial question whose genesis antedates the life of the early Church. In his Apology, the church father Tertullian defended Christians as citizens of the Roman empire in the truest and best sense. Continue Reading...

Bibles, Profits, and Technology

When John concluded his gospel, he supposed that if all of Jesus’ doings were written down, “that even the whole world would not have room for the books that would be written.” The last two millennia have seen quite a bit of change, to be sure. Continue Reading...

Tempering Predictions of Progress

I was reading about Bill Gates’ speech to the Northern Virginia Technology Council last week, which received a lot of media coverage (PDF transcript here). In the speech about software innovation, Gates “speculated that some of the most important advances will come in the ways people interact with computers: speech-recognition technology, tablets that will recognize handwriting and touch-screen surfaces that will integrate a wide variety of information.” “I don’t see anything that will stop the rapid advance,” Gates said. Continue Reading...

GodblogCon 2007 Day 1

Today was a pretty full day that just wrapped up a few minutes ago. Al Mohler, president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, KY, opened up the day with a keynote address, “Pioneering the New Media for Christ.” Mohler emphasized the communicative mandate of the Christian faith: “To be a Christian is to bear the responsibility to communicate.” Setting this statement within the context of stewardship, Mohler emphasized the biblical foundations for a Christian view of communication. Continue Reading...

‘The Idolatry of the Porn Worldview’

The folks over at the Reformation21 blog, produced of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals, have a great discussion going about the spiritual, cultural, and pastoral implications of pornography (here, here, and here). Continue Reading...

Minds that Matter

In his recent and fascinating book Five Minds for the Future, Harvard professor Howard Gardner outlines the 5 basic types of intelligence people have: 1. The Disciplinary Mind: the mastery of major schools of thought, including science, mathematics, and history, and of at least one professional craft; 2. Continue Reading...

Scientists Against Technology

An addendum to my Wedesday commentary, in which I highlighted the positive ecological role human beings play by developing new technologies: Joel Schwartz at NRO draws attention to the fact that there are some scientists who, for various possible reasons, actually oppose the development of technology that minimizes or reverses the impact of human activity on the environment (called, with respect to climate change, geoengineering). Continue Reading...