Latest Posts

Fa(s)t Food

There’s yet more evidence that supports my claim, “Besieged by the media and public opinion, quick-service restaurants have got the reputation for being unhealthy. But the truth of the matter is more complex. Continue Reading...

The Idol of Nationalism

What Amrith Lal calls patriotism in this piece from the Times of India is probably more accurately called nationalism, but the point is well-taken nonetheless. The brief essay begins: As practised in our times, it is religion at its worst. Continue Reading...

Debunking the Preservationist Myth

An article from Nature examines how even human activity as inherently destructive as military exercises can actually boost biodiversity. In “Military exercises ‘good for endangered species,'” Michael Hopkin writes of the results of a study conducted following US military exercises in Germany. Continue Reading...

Space Tourism

In an interview with The Space Review Richard Garriott, vice-chairman of Space Adventures discusses the possibilities of space tourism and the potential market in the United States. Garriott describes Space Adventures as currently an [travel] agent, and we have millions of dollars in cash paid reservations for sub orbital flights. Continue Reading...

A Relevant Essay

Given the discussion that’s been going on around the Acton site over the last week or so (on the blog here and here, in the commentary comments section, and in this week’s poll question), I’m pointing out this timely piece in yesterday’s St. Continue Reading...

Gimme Shelter

Check out this piece at Christianity Today about churches in Zimbabwe providing shelter to the poor who have been dispossessed by Pres. Mugabe’s “drive out trash” campaign: “One Christian worker who requested anonymity said, ‘In some parts of Harare, people have gone to spend the nights in their local churches. Continue Reading...

Godless Science and Natural Revelation

This week’s commentary by David Michael Phelps cites a University of Chicago study showing “that seventy-six percent of physicians believe in God, and fifty-five percent say their faith influences their medical practice.” Another new study by Rice Univesity sociologist Elaine Howard Ecklund “surveyed 1,646 faculty members at elite research universities, asking 36 questions about belief and spiritual practices.” Ecklund’s survey covers a variety of scientific disciplines, and as the LiveScience report puts it, “Those in the social sciences are more likely to believe in God and attend religious services than researchers in the natural sciences, the study found.” What follows is a bit of an understatement: “The opposite had been expected.” The results of the survey broken down between natural and social sciences are as follows: “Nearly 38 percent of natural scientists — people in disciplines like physics, chemistry and biology — said they do not believe in God. Continue Reading...

Recent Climate Research

Roy Spencer at Tech Central Station examines some of the latest climatology research published in the journal Science. One essential point of the new findings is that the temperature readings based on satellite information may not be as reliable as previously thought. Continue Reading...

Mmmm….Bacon….

In John Stossel’s article yesterday, he recounts a story that illustrates the dangers of artificial wage contols. (Davis Bacon is a federal law that requires construction workers be paid an amount determined by a bureaucratic formula instead of wages determined by market forces.) When Chicago decided to repair the Cabrini Green housing project, people who lived in the project assumed such a big job would provide work for the unemployed young men who grew up there. Continue Reading...