Junk (Food) Science

July 20, 2005 • by Jordan J. Ballor

Junk (Food) Science

One of the reasons cited for various government programs promoting healthy eating, including the “fat” or “fast food tax,” is the obesity epidemic in America. This is especially true for America’s youth, as childhood obesity is often cited as one of the nation’s greatest health risks. Continue Reading...

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