Latest Posts

G.K. Chesterton on the Paradox of Christian Exile

In Episode 1 of For the Life of the World, Stephen Grabill and Evan Koons lay the groundwork for viewing Christian cultural engagement through the lens of exile. “We are strangers in a strange land,” Grabill explains, and yet “we are meant to make something of the world.” As Koons recently expounded over at Q Ideas, Christians have long struggled with the idea of being “in but not of the world,” resorting to a range of faulty attitudes and approaches, whether it be fortification, domination, or accommodation. Continue Reading...

The Connection Between Inequality and Poverty Alleviation

“If there is one thing that religious leaders around the world seem to agree on today,” says Acton research associate Dylan Pahman, “it is the evils of income inequality stemming from a globalized economy.” But as Pahman points out, there is a connection between inequality and poverty alleviation that affirms the moral merits of economic liberty: It would seem the consensus is that economic inequalities have increased worldwide, and this is a clear moral evil. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 08.07.14

Social Justice Includes Defending Religious Liberty Chelsen Vicari, Juicy Ecumenism It may be that we are raising a generation of Evangelicals who resent self-sufficiency, upward mobility and success stories. I’m sorry to say these resentments, specifically among Millennials, is due in large part to an over-emphasis and misuse of “social justice” advocacy touted by the Left within our church sermons and Sunday school lessons. Continue Reading...

How a Study on Hurricanes Proved Bastiat’s Broken Window Fallacy

After 6,712 cyclones, typhoons, and hurricanes the evidence is clear: Bastiat was right all along. In 1850, the economic journalist Frédéric Bastiat introduced the parable of the broken window to illustrate why destruction, and the money spent to recover from destruction, is not actually a net benefit to society (see the video at the end of this post for an explanation of the broken window fallacy). Continue Reading...

Tony Dungy and Heresy

In this week’s Acton Commentary Hunter Baker wonders why are so-called progressives eager to use political power to “correct” the thinking of those they disagree with: You may not have realized it, but Tony Dungy is a heretic. Continue Reading...