Acton On The AirOn Friday afternoon, Saumel Gregg, Acton Institute Director of Research, joined host Al Kresta on Kresta in the Afternoon to discuss the ongoing government shutdown from a Catholic perspective. In the course of his introduction, Kresta referred to Gregg’s latest book, Tea Party Catholic, as “the single best work to help us get into a Catholic understanding of our social responsibilities.” As usual, Al and Sam provide us with a fine discussion, which you can listen to using the audio player below.

golden-2_2386999bFrom the Financial Times:

Greece’s neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party has penetrated the country’s police force, set up caches of heavy weapons in remote locations and trained its recruits to carry out brutal attacks against immigrants and political opponents, according to the country’s top security official.

Nikos Dendias, minister of public order and civil protection, said in an interview with the Financial Times that Golden Dawn’s cult of extreme violence was “unique” among European far-right groups.

The Ancient Greek leaders stressed things like prudent philosophy, intellectual inquiry, and the importance of reason. Modern Greeks – along with the governments of most European nations – spend money they don’t have on things they don’t need at rates they can’t maintain. The party is over for big-government socialism, but the economic (and political) nightmare of recession, depression and an increasingly unruly citizenry has just begun.

And what type of clientele comprise the membership of a group like the Golden Dawn? What do many of those who join share in common?
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Blog author: jcarter
Monday, October 14, 2013
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Joining the Race for Clean Water
Marian V. Liautaud, Christianity Today

Why lace up your sneakers when you could just write a check? A personal look at what’s driving the charity running craze.

How We Can Bolster American Families
Joy Pullmann, Values & Capitalism

The most difficult part of this discussion is not realizing the obvious truth that the American family is in trouble (although unfortunately, that’s often hard enough), it’s knowing what to do about it.

Why We Separate Church and State
Seth Mandel, Commentary

The struggle to explain the motivations of statecraft through history often gets mired in the difficulty of differentiating between economic self-interest and cultural prime movers.

How Do We Create Long-Term Value for the Kingdom of God?
Hugh Whelchel, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

So how do we overcome the knowledge problem to accomplish goals, answer our callings, and create value for others?

9973TressDunceCapThe New York Times reports on a study that found that young adults in the United States not only fare poorly in math and science compared with their international competitors — something we have known for years — but also now in literacy.

More surprisingly, even middle-aged Americans — who, on paper, are among the best-educated people of their generation anywhere in the world — are barely better than middle-of-the-pack in skills. Arne Duncan, the education secretary, released a statement saying that the findings “show our education system hasn’t done enough to help Americans compete — or position our country to lead — in a global economy that demands increasingly higher skills.” The study is the first based on new tests developed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a coalition comprised mostly of developed nations, and administered in 2011 and 2012 to thousands of people, ages 16 to 65, by 23 countries.

The great irony of this story is that the United States spends 7.3 percent of its gross domestic product on education from pre-kindergarten through the university level — the fifth highest in the world — yet the results don’t match the spending. What is happening? Why are we spending more and more money on education and producing less competitive students? I offer the following thoughts:
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UntitledIn the U.S. there are approximately 4,500 colleges and universities (2,774 4-year institutions and 1,721 2-year institutions). Most of the institutions that were founded prior to 1900 began as Christian colleges, though only about 970 schools are still religiously affiliated. Out of those 970 sectarian schools, 570 are distinctively Christian.

America has almost as many Christian schools as the entire rest of the world combined. But that’s quickly changing. As the Chronicles of Higher Education notes, in the developing world there is a renaissance in Christian higher education:
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On Oct. 3, the Acton Institute held its annual luncheon and lecture in Houston at the Omni Houston Hotel.

Kris Alan Mauren, co-founder and executive director of the Acton Institute, emceed the event. The Rev. Martin Nicholas, pastor of Sugar Land First United Methodist Church, gave the invocation for the afternoon and the Hon. George W. Strake gave the introduction. Rev. Robert A. Sirico, president and co-founder of Acton, gave the keynote lecture for the afternoon: “Religious Liberty and Economic Liberty: Twin Guarantees for Human Freedom.”

Rev. Sirico began the lecture by giving a background of the Christian faith and religious liberty in the Roman Empire with the story of the emperor Constantine and the coming of the Edict of Milan in A.D. 313. This edict declared religious liberty and tolerance in the empire at the moment when Christianity was on the rise and established tolerance for all religions not just Christianity. It also restored properties to the church if they had been previously confiscated by the state. (more…)