MatthewChristian’s Library Press has now released Matthew, the third primer in its Opening the Scriptures series. You can purchase it on Amazon today.

Written by Dutch Reformed pastor and preacher Cornelis Vonk, and translated by Nelson D. Kloosterman, the volume provides an introduction to the book of Matthew. Like others in the series, it is neither a technical commentary nor a collection of sermons, but rather an accessible primer for the average churchgoer.

Matthew focuses heavily on the Gospel itself, providing an accessible interpretation of its unique messages and themes, but always tracing each back to the larger unfolding God’s ultimate plan and to the grand totality of Scripture. This is true for all volumes in the series, but is particularly valuable here, given Matthew’s routine references to the Old Testament (no fewer than 59 times, compared to 25 in Mark, 32 in Luke, and 13 in John). (more…)

“All that exists is God’s gift to man, and it all exists to make God known to man, to make man’s life communion with God…God blesses everything He creates, and, in biblical language, this means that He makes all creation the sign and means of His presence and wisdom, love and revelation.” -Alexander Schmemann, from For the Life of the World (the book)

The following clip is an excerpt from the first episode of For the Life of the World: Letters to the Exiles (the film series), and seeks to set the stage for uncovering the bigger picture of our salvation. The question: What is it actually for?

We are all working within a fallen order, yet God’s gift of his very own son provided a way and a means through which we can be redeemed and restored, and unleash our gifts unto others in turn. (more…)

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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Global Warming Was Worth It
David Harsanyi, The Federalist

Is progress a good thing? Generally speaking, it seems like an easy question – unless, that is, you’re in the “sustainability movement.”

Working Towards a Biblical View of Wealth Creation
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

The Bible emphasizes repeatedly that where there is not idolatry, wealth creation is not a bad thing. In fact, God desires to bless his children.

The Minimum Wage Can Never Be High Enough
Ike Brannon, The American

The minimum wage is a facile non-solution for the complicated problem of poverty in America.

What the Rich Give to New York
Nicole Gelinas, City Journal

The city’s private wealth pays for its vast public assets—which benefit everyone, especially the poor.

Chelsen Vicari

Chelsen Vicari

If you’re familiar with the Acton Institute and with the discussions that take place here on the PowerBlog, you’ll know that Acton has had a lot to say about the Religious Left. (For instance, here’s an example from 2008 featuring Acton President Rev. Robert A. Sirico). This is to be expected, considering that the way we approach economics and society generally are often very different, and lead to very different ideas on how to build a stronger society and solve the problems that stand in the way of that process. But it seems fair to say that sometimes, these differences go beyond simple arguments over economics or policy disputes: there seem to be very real differences in the way the Christian Right and Left view the very faith that they claim to share.

On this edition of Radio Free Acton, Acton Communications Specialist and regular PowerBlog Contributor Sarah Stanley speaks with Chelsen Vicari, Evangelical Program Director at the Institute on Religion and Democracy, about her new book Distortion: How the New Christian Left is Twisting the Gospel and Damaging the Faith. You can listen to the podcast via the audio player below.

Blog author: ehilton
Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Cabrini Green Residents Call On Chicago To Open Housing To Katrina VictimsMaybe you’re a parent. If you’re not and you’re a reasonable adult, imagine you are a parent.

It’s a lovely day. Your six-year-old would like to play outside. You do not live in the median of an expressway. You do not have a child molester living next door. There is no pack of dogs roaming your neighborhood. You give your son a kiss, a pat on the back, and send him out.

And then Child Protective Services comes to visit. No, really. This happened.

I was going through the piles of mail. There was a knock at the door, which was weird because no one ever knocks on our door unless it’s the UPS guy, and he doesn’t come until dinner time. Corralling the crazy barky dog, I looked out the front door window and saw a woman I did not know — and my six-year-old. (more…)

poverty_20130311One of the most underreported stories of the last decade is about good news: we’re winning the struggle against chronic hunger around the globe.

A new U.N. report estimates that the number of chronically undernourished people in the world has decreased by more than 100 million over the last decade, and 209 million lower than in 1990–92. Those figures are even more remarkable when we consider the global population has increased by almost 2 billion since 1990.

According to the report, since 1990-92, 63 countries have reached the hunger target of halving the proportion of undernourished people and 25 countries have achieved the goal of halving the number of undernourished people. Of the 63 developing countries, 11 already had undernourishment levels below 5 percent (the methodological limit that can assure significance of the results different from zero) in 1990-1992 and have been able to keep it in that interval, and are therefore not the prime focus of the 2014 report.

In the same period, the prevalence of undernourishment has fallen from 18.7 to 11.3 percent globally and from 23.4 to 13.5 percent for developing countries. There has likely never been a time in modern human history when such a large percentage of the population has been freed from chronic hunger.

Unfortunately, about 805 million people — mostly in Africa and South-Eastern Asia still remain without adequate food resources, due largely to conflicts and natural disasters. But we’re making remarkable progress. In fact, as Steve Davies of LearnLiberty explains, in the near future we may be able to eradicate extreme poverty and global hunger altogether.

(more…)

Cross in Memory of Lithuanian Deportees.

Cross in Memory of Lithuanian Deportees.

Recently I read Leave Your Tears in Moscow, a harrowing and ultimately triumphant account of Barbara Armonas’s time in a Soviet Siberian prison camp. Armonas, who passed away at the age of 99 in 2008, was separated from her American husband and daughter in Lithuania at the outbreak of World War II. Her husband John Armonas and daughter, both born in the United States, fled Lithuania. Barbara and her son John Jr. stayed behind. Although Barbara had lived for a time in Cleveland with her husband, she was not yet an American citizen. The thinking was if her son remained with her, reunification of the family would be easier in a few months.

The News Herald in Ohio has an excellent profile of their story published in 2009. Armonas and her son were part of the Lithuanian deportations by the Soviet Union, at least 70 percent of the deported Lithuanians were women and children. In a farce trial, Armonas was eventually convicted of espionage and sentenced to the maximum 25 years in Soviet labor camps. Armonas, who was not political, published a damning account of collectivism and the socialist Soviet state in Leave Your Tears in Moscow. During Nikita Khrushchev’s visit to the United States in 1959, Armonas’s daughter Donna pleaded to the Soviet Premier for the release of her mother. The encounter gained worldwide attention and eventually led to the release of Armonas and her son to reunite with their family in America. They had been separated for 20 years.

The book, published in 1961, raised awareness of the plight of Lithuanians under Soviet occupation. Below are a few quotes and excerpts from her memoir:
(more…)

Mako Fujimura, one of the artists hosted by the Acton Institute for ArtPrize 2014

Mako Fujimura, one of the artists hosted by the Acton Institute for ArtPrize 2014

Here in Grand Rapids, we are awaiting the beginning of ArtPrize (Sept. 24-Oct. 12.) For those of us who live or work in the city, we are seeing signs of it: posters hung in coffee shop windows, artists installing pieces, restaurants adding waitstaff, and venues getting spit-shined. It’s a big deal: in 2013, ArtPrize brought in 400,000+ visitors to this city, an estimated $22 million in net growth and hundreds of jobs. Not too shabby for an event that didn’t even exist a few short years ago.

The genesis of ArtPrize was the mind of Rick DeVos, a man focused on entrepreneurship and starting conversations. DeVos started ArtPrize not as a way to bring money to his hometown (“a happy accident“), but because:

…his forays into tech startups had made him love the democracy of the Internet and the possibilities afforded by crowdsourcing. Why not a contest with an open call for artists and an open vote? “I was always intrigued with the X-Prize model,” he said, referring to the $10 million prize offered for private-sector space flight. “This whole idea of putting a big prize out there and then putting as few rules around it as possible, not trying to dictate what the outcome should look like.” The idea expanded from there, and in 2009, five months after he first announced it, ArtPrize opened to the public.

(more…)

Word is continuing to spread about For the Life of the World: Letters to the Exiles, the latest film series from the Acton Institute, which seeks to expand the Christian imagination when it comes to whole-life stewardship and cultural engagement.

With screenings and appearances at places like Q Nashville, Flourish San Diego, Acton U, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and Regent University, to name just a few, Christians from a variety of backgrounds and perspectives are getting a taste of the series and responding with enthusiastic praise.

Andy Crouch offers the following:

Daniel Melvill Jones calls it “outstanding for its cohesive use of creativity and imagination”:

Every episode features at least one visual illustration that later becomes an analogy for the teaching. A Rube Goldberg machine that attempts to cook Evan’s breakfast backfires and become an example of the banality of utilitarian work. A ruined paper lantern that lands in Evan’s front yard is later used as a moving visual illustration of how our lives in the world are offered up to God as a prayer. A punk motorcyclist arrives on Evan’s front porch and uses puppets to tell a illustrating the importance of a believers call to hospitality…

…Anyone who watches the series will be introduced or reminded of these doctrines, but Evan is not content to let such truths sit dormant on the view’s mental shelf. He brings them home by closing every episode with a “letter to exiles”, a hand written monologue. In these letters encourages us with the reminder that we carry these truths into our lives as the redeemed children of God, not through our own power but through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

(more…)

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Southern California Becoming Less Family-Friendly
Joel Kotkin

The British Talmudic scholar Abraham Cohen noted that, throughout history, children were thought of as “a precious loan from God to be guarded with loving and fateful care.” Yet, increasingly and, particularly, here in Southern California, we are rejecting this loan, and abandoning our role as parents.

The Most Interesting (Business) Man in the World
Hunter Baker, The Imaginative Conservative

A number of readers of this essay will be familiar with the beer company commercials built around “The Most Interesting Man in the World.” This man, a virile and hirsute senior citizen, has moved through his century with peerless confidence and style. When I think of my own candidate for the most interesting man, I find that Peter Drucker (1909–2005) comes to mind.

Housing Market Not ‘Too Big To Fail,’ But ‘Too Regulated To Succeed’
Erik Telford, The Federalist

The Obama administration is again destabilizing the housing market and seizing investors’ returns on their money.

Finding Purpose in Your Work Means Joining God in His
Timothy Ewest, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

God is setting out to redeem the world, and he chooses the everyday lives of men and woman to carry out his plan – really! God calls us to join him, and this calling historically has happened in three ways.