What race is your company? Asian, Samoan, American Indian, other?

If you find that question absurdhardhat you probably haven’t heard (I hadn’t) that a for-profit can be be African American — an African American person — under federal law.

According to Matt Bowman, that was the  overwhelming consensus view by an Obama appointee to the Fourth Circuit court of appeals. The ruling allows minority-owned companies to object to racial discrimination committed against them under the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Bowman explains that in Carnell Construction Corporation v. Danville Redevelopment and Housing Authority, an African-American-owned for-profit construction company in Virginia accused a local government—which had awarded the company a federally subsidized building contract—of racial discrimination during the building project.

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Blog author: jcarter
Friday, March 21, 2014
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Pope Francis: Without work, human dignity is “wounded”
Ed Morrissey, Hot Air

If it seems odd to root for reduced opportunity in favor of government subsidies, then this message today from Pope Francis will resonate.

The Most Influential Reformer You’ve Never Heard of
Karen Swallow Prior, Christianity Today

Hannah More shows us what happens when Christians focus on world-changing instead of in-fighting.

The Challenge of Pluralism
Ross Douthat, New York Times

If we take pluralism seriously, the whole point of the concept is to enable groups to “throw up a shield” against the pressure of consensus, and develop and promote alternatives that are rejected the powerful, or by society as a whole.

Diplomas vs. Dirty Jobs
Nick Gillespie, Reason

TV host Mike Rowe on the educational bias against unglamorous, good-paying work.

nochristiansUsually, discrimination against Christians is subtle and discreet. But the Ferndale Public Schools in Oakland County, Michigan, seems to be quite open about their bias. As Michigan Capitol Confidential discovered, the teachers union contract requires the district to provide “special consideration” to “those of the non-Christian faith” in hiring decisions:

The contract ran from 2011 to 2012 but was extended to 2017. The teachers belong to the Ferndale Education Association, a division of the Michigan Education Association.

Regarding promotion to a vacant position, it states on page 22:

Should there be two (2) or more of these applicants with equal qualifications for the position and one (1) or more of these applicants with equal qualifications is a current employee, the current employee with the greatest seniority shall be assigned. Special consideration shall be given to women and/or minority defined as: Native American, Asian American, Latino, African American and those of the non-Christian faith. However, in all appointments to vacant positions, the Board’s decision shall be final.

Earlier in the contract is a “no discrimination clause” that states no employee can be discriminated against based on their religion.

Why would the issue of someone’s religious background come up in hiring for a public school position? As Richard Thompson, president of the Thomas More Law Center in Ann Arbor, says, “Now, they are going to ask people, ‘Are you a Christian?’ ” Thompson said. “Are people going to hide their faith so they can get a promotion? There is a subtle persecution [here] of Christians.”

UPDATE: According to the Christian Post, the district is going to remove that language. “I have no idea how that ever got in there, and nobody here does,” Shelley Rose, interim director of communications at Ferndale Public Schools, told The Christian Post in an interview on Wednesday. “We just heard back from legal counsel this morning,” Rose told CP, adding that “there will be new contracts and that language will not be in the new contracts.”

Religion & Ethics Newsweekly featured the following video on Dorothy Day. Her cause for canonization in the Catholic Church has been championed by Cardinal Timothy Dolan, who says Day’s life represents so much of the struggle of our times.

So there was sexual immorality, there was a religious search, and there was a pregnancy out of wedlock and an abortion. Her life, of course, like Saul on the way to Damascus, was radically changed when she became introduced to Jesus Christ and his church, and after that she became an apostle.

The Catholic Worker Movement, which Day founded, continues to feed people across the globe, and has never received government funding. It remains both a local organization, staffed by neighborhood folks, and an international community, reaching nations like Uganda and Scotland. Day is described in this piece as an “independent woman” who looked for guidance from the community of saints.

Blog author: jsunde
Thursday, March 20, 2014
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fieryfurnacebw2I have been known to make certain comparisons between the punitive HHS mandate and King Nebuchadnezzar’s infamous power trip — an analogy that casts the Green Family and others like them as the Shadrachs, Meshachs, and Abednegos of modern-day coercion subversion.

As I wrote just over a year ago:

As we continue to see Christian business leaders refusing to bow to King Nebuchadnezzar’s Golden Image—choosing economic martyrdom over secularist conformity—the more this administration’s limited, debased, and deterministic view of man and society will reveal itself. Through it all, even as the furnace grows hotter and hotter, Christians should remember that a Fourth Man stands close by, offering peace and protection according to a different system altogether.

Having already connected such dots, it’s worth noting that, in a recent profile, Hobby Lobby’s CEO seems to be sniffing the same stuff:

Lately, it’s the Book of Daniel that comes often to [Steve Green’s] mind. In Chapter 3, Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego would rather face a fiery furnace than bow to an idol at the command of King Nebuchadnezzar.

Green said, “They told the king ‘Our God is able to deliver us.’” (more…)

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, March 20, 2014
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Military Families Want Educational Options That Meet Their Children’s Needs
Brandon Hershey, The Foundry

Educational opportunity for military families means that military parents can choose schools that will support the needs of their children.

What Do Protestants Think of Pope Francis?
Barna Group

It’s widely accepted that Catholics love the Holy Father, but what about people of other traditions? Some have called Francis a pope for Protestants or for Millennials, but what do these groups actually think of him? And if his influence is so far-reaching, what has been the impact of the so-called “Pope Effect,” one year into his papacy?

Did Sweden Just Make the Case for Free Market Policies?
David Kinkade, Free Enterprise

The changes are driven in large part by the growing recognition that gargantuan government sectors and overgenerous entitlements are simply unsustainable. As Adrian Wooldridge notes in a 2013 article for The Economist, “they have reached the limits of big government.”

What Is Religious Freedom Good For?
Peter Berger, The American Interest

Saying that religious freedom is important because it leads to economic prosperity may strike some as unnecessarily amoral. But we should not be overly disturbed by narrow interests bringing about morally desirable consequences.

coolidge bioCalvin Coolidge’s autobiography was published in 1929, shortly after Coolidge left the White House. He wrote the book in long hand completely by himself. Sales at the time were great but some commentators panned it as being too short and simplistic with little new information or juicy tidbits. In Amity Shlaes’s biography of Coolidge she notes, “Not every reader appreciated its sparse language, but the short book would stand up well to the self-centered narratives other statesmen produced, especially those who relied on dictation and, in their vanity, failed to revise.” Those who read it will find the writing style impressively clear and will easily comprehend the deep well of conservatism which shaped Coolidge’s thought.

Coolidge devoted a number of pages in his autobiography to the positive influence he received from some of his professors at Amherst College. Much of the praise was given to Charles Garman, Coolidge’s favorite professor. Garman, an alumnus of Amherst, was a professor of moral philosophy and metaphysics. Garman also studied theology at Yale and offered a high degree of religious instruction in his courses. He cultivated critical thinking and class discussion. A short overview on the Amherst College website of the Garman years, reads in part: “Garman’s teaching was considered subversive by some for he encouraged his students not to memorize or parrot what they had heard, but to think through the issues for themselves and come to their own conclusions.” In his autobiography, Coolidge said Garman “was one of the most remarkable men,” and he “truly drew men out.” Throughout his life, Coolidge leaves little doubt of the positive influence Garman had in shaping his thought and character. In this excerpt from Coolidge’s autobiography, he describes the spiritual learning that went on inside Garman’s class. It also serves as a pronounced contrast to the kind of instruction that occurs in most contemporary philosophy classes across colleges and universities in America today:
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