PowerLinks 03.20.14

March 20, 2014 • by Joe Carter

PowerLinks 03.20.14

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Colloquium: Philosophy and Theology in the 21st Century

I am looking forward to presenting a paper at an upcoming colloquium in Berekely on July 16-20: “What has Athens to do with Jerusalem: Dialogue between Philosophy and Theology in the 21st Century.” From the colloquium press release: The Province of the Most Holy Name of Jesus (Western U.S.A.) and its center of studies, the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology, will host a colloquium to discuss the intersection of philosophy and theology, titled: “What has Athens to do with Jerusalem? Continue Reading...

What Would God’s March Madness Look Like?

“What would God’s March Madness look like?” asks David Mitchell in this week’s Acton Commentary. “Could competition focus churches and church members the same way a college tournament focuses people on basketball?” What counts as service to others? Continue Reading...

To Obey Is Better Than Sacrifice: A Challenge to ‘Good Intentions’

When decrying instances of do-gooder activism gone wrong, it’s become rather routine for critics to respond by saying, “good intentions aren’t enough” — and to a great extent, rightly so. Yet, as I’ve argued before, in addition to critiquing the outcomes of our actions, we should also pause and ask whether our “good intentions” are all that good to begin with. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 03.19.14

Ryan and Liberal Welfare-State Amnesia Jonathan S. Tobin , Commentary What’s at stake is an attempt to reinstate the old shibboleths that were the foundation of the liberal welfare state that was buried when President Bill Clinton said the era of big government was over and then signed a historic welfare reform act into law. Continue Reading...

Video: Lawrence Reed on the Best and Worst American Presidents

Last week, Acton welcomed Lawrence Reed to the podium of the Mark Murray Auditorium for his Acton Lecture Series address, entitled American Presidents: The Best and the Worst. Reed, the President of the Foundation for Economic Education, tackled the subject with his usual grace and an evident (and praiseworthy) passion for the protection of the individual liberties of average citizens from the ever-expanding power of central government. Continue Reading...