Blog author: jcarter
Monday, January 27, 2014
By

Have Icon, Will Travel
Alexander F. C. Webster, American Orthodox Institute

The ministry of an Orthodox Army chaplain in southwest Asia post-9/11.

A Moral Basis for Markets: A Response to James Stoner
Michael C. Munger, Public Discourse

All truly voluntary exchange should be allowed without state interference. But many exchanges that are not fully voluntary should be allowed, too. It is immoral to restrict the ability of market processes to create a space where right action is rewarded and immoral actions are punished.

Key findings about growing religious hostilities around the world
Agelina Theodorou, Pew Research Center

Our new report found that a third of the 198 countries and territories studied in 2012 had a high or very high level of social hostilities involving religion, the highest share in the six years of the study.

Why It’s So Hard To Come Out of the Homeschool Closet
Gracy Olmstead, The American Conservative

Why aren’t more people open about homeschooling? When people ask me where I went to high school, I usually have to take a deep breath before I reply. Here it comes. “I was homeschooled,” I’ll reply.

Acton Institute Director of Research and author of Tea Party Catholic Samuel Gregg joined host John Pinhiero for a discussion of his latest book and the Catholic influence on the American founding on Faith and Reason, Pinhiero’s new show on Holy Family Radio in Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo, Michigan. The wide-ranging discussion lasted a full broadcast hour, and can be heard using the audio player below.

admit oneAs I write this, it’s 10 degrees outside, with a windchill of 8 below 0. Not much fun, even if all you’re doing is scooting from a building door to your car.

Now imagine being homeless. And a trafficking victim.

Mary David writes that the severe winter weather is a burden on the trafficked population, even though shelters in larger cities work to offer longer hours and services to those on the streets:

But what about the abuse that takes place at homeless shelters? What about the fact that many well-meaning groups and organizations lack the resources or means to keep out pimps, recruiters for traffickers, and those who otherwise take advantage of helpless women and children? Those who target these locations because they know the vulnerabilities of the people who enter?

(more…)

Fighting off entrepreneurs! Taking on any threat to their power! Collect ’em all!

Mission:Work, Patheos, Faith, WorkPatheos has just launched a new channel called MISSION:WORK, which aims to host a wide and varied discussion about faith and work. Led by senior editor Chris Armstrong of Bethel Seminary, the site will serve as a hub of sorts, drawing content from a variety of places, including the Acton Institute, to cultivate a conversation on whole-life discipleship.

As described on the web site:

“MISSION:WORK is a place where conversation happens about work and faith. We cover topics ranging from daily life in the workplace, to what the Bible says about work and vocation, to economic systems and their relationship to Christian beliefs, to how to know if God is calling you to a specific job, to how the local church can better equip workers. We draw on content from several other websites pondering these issues, including Theology of Work.org, The High Calling, The Oikonomia Network, the Acton Institute, and the Kern Family Foundation, to find stories, testimonies, tips, biblical wisdom, and challenges for individuals, businesses, pastors, and civic leaders as we work to create a society where God’s economy brings human flourishing for all.” (more…)

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, January 24, 2014
By

The Philosophical Basis for Religious Liberty
Michel Therrien, Crisis Magazine

We should be careful in the present public discourse around religious liberty. If we employ relativism to defend this right, we can be assured that this same rationale will come back to bite us.

A Fiscal Conservative Defends the Pope
Scott Fyall, Values & Capitalism

Fiscal conservatism and Catholicism’s teachings on helping the poor are compatible—but it is up to us to make it so.

On masculinity and the War on Poverty
Melanie Sturm, Washington Examiner

Rather than apply Band-Aids to the cancer of chronic unemployment — like unemployment-insurance extensions and minimum-wage hikes — political elites must focus on the real problem: Millions of males, especially less-educated men, are “unhitched from the engine of growth,” according to a 2011 Brookings Institution report.

Five Things Christians Need to Know about Income Inequality, and What You Can Do about It
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Bringing about flourishing through good stewardship requires discerning the biblical principles that will lead us to understand whether income inequality is a problem, and if so, how we are to respond. The best way to summarize this tough topic is through these five points that are critical for Christians to understand in order to bring about greater flourishing, especially for the poor.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, January 23, 2014
By

economistsIs the teaching of basic microeconomics — opportunity cost, supply and demand curves, incentives, etc. — a form of conservative propaganda?

Most people, including almost all economists whether liberal or conservatives, would obviously say “no.” Yet many educators, as well as the general public, believe it’s true.

In 1994, the Federal Goals 2000 Act expanded the national standards movement to include the teaching of economics in K-12 education. This led to the creation in 1997 of the Voluntary National Content Standards in Economics (VNCSE), which were organized around the core principles of the discipline. While there has been almost no controversy within the discipline over the VNCSE, notes Robert M. Costrell, the objections have come almost entirely from those outside the discipline. Costrell adds that, “There are many who believe that mainstream economics provides an unwarranted defense of free markets, or at least gives short shrift to the case for government intervention.”

Joy Pullmann provides some examples of criticism from non-economists that Costrell chronicles:
(more…)