Judge Nap Headshot 7-13The focus of Acton University is scholarship: the participants spend their days learning from a faculty that is wide-ranging, accomplished, and masters in their chosen fields. The Acton Institute is pleased that Judge Andrew Napolitano, currently a Fox News Senior Analyst, will be joining us to teach “Freedom of Conscience and the Constitution.”

Judge Napolitano, author of numerous books including It Is Dangerous to Be Right When the Government Is Wrong: The Case for Personal Freedom and Theodore and Woodrow: How Two American Presidents Destroyed Constitutional Freedom, was the youngest life-tenured Superior Court judge in the history of the State of New Jersey.  He sat on the bench from 1987 to 1995, when he returned to private practice. Napolitano also taught law for 13 years. Now, he appears daily, Monday through Friday, on the Fox News Channel. (more…)

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, January 16, 2014

Barack_Obama_signature_and_pen (1)On Tuesday, in his first cabinet meeting of the year, President Obama indicated he is prepared to use executive actions more frequently to advance administration goals. “We are not just going to be waiting for legislation in order to make sure that we are providing Americans the kind of help that they need. I’ve got a pen and I’ve got a phone,” Obama told his Cabinet.

Over at First Things, Robert George, Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University, provides a blistering reply to the President’s “I’ve got a pen . . . ” remark:


Becki Essner

Over the next few weeks, the PowerBlog will be featuring people who have attended Acton University and their experiences, via podcasts. By hearing how Acton University has affected a variety of people in so many ways, we hope to encourage those who’ve never been to Acton University to consider registering for AU 2014.

Today’s podcast features Becki Essner, a teacher at Notre Dame Regional High School in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Becki has attended Acton University three times, and has been enriched each year. In fact, she says the experience “touched my very soul.”

Please take a few minutes to listen to Becki talk about her time at Acton University.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, January 16, 2014

Ukraine Catholic leader: government threats will not intimidate Church
Catholic World News

The leader of the Ukrainian Catholic Church has vowed that his clergy will not be deterred by the government’s threat to revoke the registration of the Byzantine-rite body.

5.3 billion people face harsh religious freedom restrictions
Brian Pellot, Religion News Service

Global religious hostilities reached a six-year high in 2012 and affected more people than government curbs on religious freedom, according to the Pew Research Center’s latest report on religious restrictions around the world.

A War on Income Inequality Is a Bad Idea
Tyler Castle, Values & Capitalism

President Obama has effectively declared a similar war on income inequality, which he believes “is the defining challenge of our time.” Expect more LBJ-like language about inequality when Obama delivers his own State of the Union address later this month.

Does the Bible Condemn Trade?
R. Mark Isaac, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Even when both economists and theologians acknowledge the “mutual benefit” motivation of free exchange, there is nevertheless a potential and important parting of the ways when the terms of “benefit” are dissected.

Blog author: jballor
Wednesday, January 15, 2014

"It's possible. I kill a lot of people."

“It’s possible. I kill a lot of people.”

H.L. Mencken once said, “Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin to slit throats.”

Over at Political Theology Today, I take a look at what a confrontation between a pirate and Alexander the Great has to teach us about politics and proximate justice, taking some cues from Augustine and Cicero, and in conversation with John Mueller and Peter Leeson.

For a bit more fanciful look at a conflict between a pirate and a prince, you can also read my reflections on “The Princess Bride” over at the University Bookman.

Five nights a week, Dr. Jim Withers walks the streets of Pittsburgh bringing free medical help to the homeless. Since 1992, he has served over 25,000 impoverished people in need of care.

Dr. Withers and others like him are doing important, praiseworthy work. But we should be careful that we don’t confuse this stop-gap measure with a solution. Providing care on the streets is necessary — for now. The goal we must work toward, though, is to help these citizens find a permanent solution that provides the care, comfort, and dignity that can never come from sleeping on a steam grate.

(Via: 22 Words)

MedicaidMoney_jpg_800x1000_q100If a large Oregon study is any indication, says Jonathan Witt in this week’s Acton Commentary, the Affordable Care Act may drive up frivolous emergency room visits and do little to improve people’s physical or economic health:

In essence, the healthcare industry becomes the enabler in a lucrative game in which patients put off needed lifestyle reform, opting instead for prescription pills, surgeries and conversations about “genetic predispositions.” None of this gets at the root problem, and indeed exacerbates the root problem. People face a moral challenge, to accept responsibility as stewards of their bodies to live a healthy lifestyle. The system, instead of spurring them on to do the responsible thing, all too often invites them to believe they are not responsible and should entrust their genetically hopeless selves into the hands of the medical/pharmaceutical industrial complex.

The full text of his essay can be found here. Subscribe to the free, weekly Acton News & Commentary and other publications here.