Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, October 8, 2013
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Five myths about anti-Christian persecution
John L. Allen, Jr., National Catholic Reporter

As a contribution towards erasing that blind spot, let’s debunk five common myths about anti-Christian persecution.

Income inequality, growth go together: Opposing view
Scott Winship, USA Today

Focus on the wealth gap is misplaced. Narrowing it shouldn’t be a priority.

Keep Calm and Read Bastiat
Art Carden, EconLog

Bastiat is just the corrective we need if we’re going to change the first rule of politics.

Biblical Warnings About Government
Art Lindsley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

The historical accounts throughout the Bible confirm that government has often overstepped its bounds, with frightening consequences.

The Author Interviewing Inmate Pastor Jerome Derricks inside a Church at Angola Prison in 2012.

The author interviewing Inmate Pastor Jerome Derricks inside an Angola Prison Church in 2012.

The New York Times ran a piece over the weekend about the success of the bible college run through New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary at Angola Prison. Warden Burl Cain calls the college “the game changer,” and he added “It changed the culture of the prison.” Historically, Angola was known as one of the most violent and dangerous prisons in the country. Now Angola’s educational model is being replicated at other state penitentiaries across the nation.

Maybe surprising to some, even the ACLU has conceded the bible college is important to Angola’s inmates:

‘I think that what Burl Cain calls moral rehabilitation is, in his mind, religious doctrine, but a lot of good has come of it,’ Ms. Esman said. ‘I think it’s unfortunate that the only college available is a Christian one, but the fact that a college is there at all is important.’

Higher educational opportunities were pulled years ago from the prison because of budget cuts and as a result the bible college has come in to fill the educational vacuum.

Religion & Liberty interviewed Warden Cain in 2012. I took a tour of Angola Prison too and wrote a commentary about the spiritual transformation and revival among inmates. Recently, I touched on the impact of the inmate led hospice program at Angola.

Acton On The AirSamuel Gregg, Acton’s Director of Research, continues to promote his latest book, Tea Party Catholic, via radio interviews across the nation. This morning, he made an appearance on San Antonio’s KTSA radio, speaking with host Jack Riccardi about the Catholic (and broader Christian) case for limited government, a free economy, and a system of ordered liberty. You can hear the exchange via the audio player below.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, October 7, 2013
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scaliaIn Stephen Vincent Benét’s 1937 short story, “The Devil and Daniel Webster“, the famous American statesman not only gets Jabez Stone, a farmer who sold his soul to the devil, out of the contract, he gets Mr. Scratch to agree “never to bother Jabez Stone nor his heirs or assigns nor any other New Hampshire man till doomsday!”

Webster was likely an excellent lawyer, but if I was in a lawsuit with the devil today I think I’d rather have Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia on my side. In a recent interview with New York magazine, the faithful Catholic jurist admits — to the surprise of the interviewer — that he believes the devil is real:
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Blog author: johnteevan
Monday, October 7, 2013
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Photo Credit: Alan Cleaver via Compfight cc

Photo Credit: Alan Cleaver via Compfight cc

This first appeared in my newsletter, Economic Prospect, in late 2008. Looking back after five years I still like it.

The American failure to save is matched by our insistence on spending to have it all. One part of the problem is the consumer’s love of debt. The other part is the government’s love of debt. Both love debt to enjoy things now and to put off the day of reckoning. How did we get so far from the idea of being content with having enough food, clothing, and shelter?

  1. This is a complex issue based at first in ‘scarcity’ which leads people to create products to fill real needs. When these products are produced people have jobs and can afford more products. Say’s Law says that production creates its own demand.
  2. There comes a point where we move beyond some invisible line and marketing takes over to create imagined needs in people. These needs are filled by more products creating more jobs. This happened after WW2 and made us very prosperous.
  3. Then there is a third stage when the credit industry takes over and tries to convince people to borrow not just for houses or cars (durables) but for anything to enhance their way of life. This started in the 1970s. Consumer debt is $2 trillion but this kind of borrowing creates still more jobs at least for as long as the party lasts.

But the day of reckoning has arrived. Will we get the point and change our behavior? Apparently not. First, the government sold bonds, then raided the trust funds (Social Security), then we borrow to stimulate the economy…then we just borrow without limit.

If Americans are not saving, who will loan us all this money? The answer is the Chinese and Asians who are amazing savers. They will loan us the money. China already owns nearly $2 trillion in U.S. government bonds. This is not a small issue.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, October 7, 2013
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The war on Christians
John L. Allen, Jr., The Spectator

The global persecution of Christians is the unreported catastrophe of our time.

Ancient monastery has few visitors amid Sinai unrest, but Bedouin neighbors protect it
William Booth, Washington Post

Thousands of years of tradition say the monastery built here marks the spot where Moses fell down on his knees before a burning bush and talked to God.

California’s New Feudalism Benefits a Few at the Expense of the Multitude
Joel Kotkin,

Like medieval serfs, increasing numbers of Californians are downwardly mobile, and doing worse than their parents: native born Latinos actually have shorter lifespans than their parents, according to one recent report.

Statecraft as Soulcraft: Liberal Democracy and the Christian Citizen
T. Kurt Jaros, Values & Capitalism

Francis J. Beckwith attempts to answer questions that Christians have regarding the role of religious beliefs in the public square.

military priestThere is a shortage of Catholic priests who serve members of the US military and their families, and it looks as if the government shutdown is going to make the situation worse. According to John Schlageter, general counsel for the Archdiocese for the Military Services, priests (whether they are active military or priests privately contracted by the military) will not be allowed to offer Mass or offer other religious services on military installations. (Some Protestant services may also be affected, but the shortage of Protestant clergy is not as extensive as it is for Catholics.) (more…)