abrahamkuyper1One of the great misconceptions about Christian higher education is that Christian colleges are places where Christian young adults go to withdraw from “the world.” A closer look at some historical roots of Christian colleges prove otherwise. For example, in the work of Abraham Kuyper (1837-1920), a Dutch pastor, theologian, politician, journalist, and statesman, we see that Christian colleges are not places of withdrawal but education centers of preparation for a life of living in a pluralistic world — a world with more similarities to Daniel’s Babylon than Europe’s 16th-century Christendom.

In the book Wisdom and Wonder Kuyper offers perspective to help Christians understand that a university education that presupposes and integrates the Triune God across the curriculum can solidly develop the Christian minds of young adults. Kuyper believes that if it is true that “the wisdom of this world is folly with God” (1 Cor 3:19), then divorcing higher education from the knowledge of God will produce knowledge that is likely to appear as foolishness to God. Christians, then, in ways consistent with honoring God, need to create additional educational opportunities so that Christians do not abandon higher education and retreat to the asceticism of church life: Christians should be trained properly for participation in public life. This is one of the many reasons Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Protestant churches have invested so much institutional capital in maintaining colleges and universities. Kuyper explains:
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Professor Oliver O'Donovan

Professor Oliver O’Donovan

We are pleased to announce that Christian’s Library Press will be co-sponsoring a special event in the D.C. area on October 8th, “The Gospel and Public Life: Cultivating a Faithful Witness in the Face of Challenge.”

Ken Myers, host of Mars Hill Audio Journal, will host a dialogue between Britain’s pre-eminent political theologian Professor Oliver O’Donovan and Mere Orthodoxy‘s Matthew Lee Anderson.

From the event flyer:

Much has been made of America’s slow transition toward a “post-Christian society.” But how should Christians prepare for the challenges ahead? What are the forgotten virtues and hidden practices that need recovering for an authentically Christian witness? How can Christians cultivate a courage and wisdom that has been in short supply?

The conversation will take place at 7:00 p.m. on October 8th at The United Methodist Building, 100 Maryland Avenue NE, Washington, DC  20002. (more…)

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, October 1, 2013
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Papal Teaching Warns Against Excessive Government
Stephen M. Krason, Crisis Magazine

While Catholic social teaching holds that the securing of the common good is a main task of the state, it nowhere says that this means that legislation or enacting a new public policy or program is the singular way to do this.

Entrepreneurship Isn’t Supposed to Be Easy
Dan Martell, Free Enterprise

“The fact that people think risk is a problem, or a flaw, is the problem,” wrote Pallotta. “Risk is an essential attribute of introducing an innovation to the world. It’s not a flaw.”

The Religious Alternative To Obamacare’s Individual Mandate
NPR

While the federal health law includes an exemption for health sharing ministries, some states have sued to try to keep them out.

How Does the Market Work?
Brian Baugus, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Have you ever called the manager of your grocery store? Ever sent him or her an e-mail? Can you imagine having to do so every time you planned to go shopping, just to make sure the store stocked the goods you needed?

Earlier this month, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia gave a lecture at the Lanier Theological Library, in which he explored the values of capitalism and socialism and their relative consistency with Christianity and the common good. While not asserting that either system is inherently “more Christian,” he does comment on the extent to which Christian principles are able to participate in each. He states:

While I would not argue that capitalism as an economic system is inherently more Christian than socialism … it does seem to me that capitalism is more dependent on Christianity than socialism is. For in order for capitalism to work – in order for it to produce a good and a stable society – the traditional Christian virtues are essential.

Additional quotes from the lecture are featured in a Houston Chronicle article by Cindy George, which was listed as a PowerLink on the Acton Blog a few weeks ago.

See the complete video of Justice Scalia’s lecture below.

Obamacare-trainTomorrow is the big day for Obamacare, despite the fact that even the Obama Administration admits it’s “glitchy.” The president is cheerleading the program, reminding us that he’s been right all along:

Reforming health care will help the economy over the long-term,” by curing health-care costs and free individuals to start small companies, he said.

Through his speech, Obama ridiculed critics of his plan, which imposes far-reaching federal requirements on one-sixth of the nation’s economy. (more…)

Religious-freedom-under-assault-K1AA258-x-largeWhen it passed in 1993, The Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) was supported left-leaning Democratic lawmakers and liberal groups like the American Civil Liberties Union. President Clinton, who signed it into law, called the bill one of his greatest accomplishments as President. A decade later they are now opposing religious liberty laws they themselves wrote. What changed in the last decade? Joseph Backholm explains how the value system of liberalism has changed:
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Acton On The AirSamuel Gregg, Acton’s Director of Research, continues his radio tour of America in support of his latest book, Tea Party Catholic, and we continue to round up those interviews for your edification. This one took place on September 24th, on WLEA in Hornell, New York. Another intelligent interview; you can listen via the audio player below.