Radio Free ActonOn this week’s edition of Radio Free Acton, Michael Matheson Miller speaks with Ambassador Francis Rooney, who served as U.S. Ambassador to the Holy See from 2005 to 2008 under President George W. Bush. Rooney has a new book out on the Vatican’s role in the world entitled The Global VaticanMiller and Rooney discuss the role of Ambassador, what it’s like to meet the Pope, and focus for a time on Pope Benedict’s Regensburg Address, and the political and diplomatic consequences that flowed from it.

This is part one of their conversation; part two will follow in next week’s edition of Radio Free Acton. To listen to the podcast, use the audio player below.

mike-rowe-life-adviceTelevision personality and former Dirty Jobs host Mike Rowe has become somewhat notorious for penning pointed responses to fans and critics on Facebook, offering routine challenges to prevailing attitudes about work, calling, and vocation.

In his most recent rant, Rowe stays true to form, explaining to a man named “Stephen” why popular vocational directives such as “follow your passion!” make for such terrible advice:

Like all bad advice, “Follow Your Passion” is routinely dispensed as though it’s wisdom were both incontrovertible and equally applicable to all. It’s not. Just because you’re passionate about something doesn’t mean you won’t suck at it. And just because you’re determined to improve doesn’t mean that you will. Does that mean you shouldn’t pursue a thing you’re passionate about?” Of course not. The question is, for how long, and to what end? (more…)

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
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Left, Right, Prudence, Principle, And Catholic Social Doctrine
J. Budziszewski, First Things

A long-running battle between the so-called Catholic left and the so-called Catholic right concerns which political issues the Church should speak about and which ones she shouldn’t.

Why I Want To Live Long And Burden My Children
Cheryl Magness, The Federalist

Ezekiel Emanuel wants to die at 75 because he equates worth with productivity. But burdens help us sacrifice our selfishness for love.

Why you should care about a Muslim inmate’s beard
Emily Hardman, CNN

I’m not a Muslim. I’ve never been imprisoned. And I don’t want to grow a beard. But I’m defending the rights of someone who is and does.

pic_related_100614_LB_BThroughout the history of the church, Christians have been actively involved in the provision and funding of health and medical resources. But for the past 50 years, these functions have been treated as political problems reserved for the state rather than matters to be addressed by the church.

Some Christians, though, are beginning to reassert this biblically mandated role by participating in health care sharing ministries (HCSM). HCSMs are not insurance companies, but nonprofit religious organizations that help members pay for medical treatments. These ministries have primarily been developed and promoted by evangelicals. But earlier this month a Catholic group launched a new HCSM:
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Chuck Chalberg as G.K. Chesterton

Chuck Chalberg as G.K. Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) is considered by many to be one of the most brilliant thinkers of the 20th century. But you’d be hard-pressed to find him discussed in any public high school (or even most colleges or universities, for that matter.) A prolific writer (he penned everything from a popular mystery series to epic ballads), he thought himself mainly a journalist. While he never attended college, his knowledge had both depth and breadth:

Chesterton was equally at ease with literary and social criticism, history, politics, economics, philosophy, and theology. His style is unmistakable, always marked by humility, consistency, paradox, wit, and wonder. His writing remains as timely and as timeless today as when it first appeared, even though much of it was published in throw away papers.

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Me tshirtIn the U.S., about half of adults live alone. Somewhere around 43 percent of kids in America are only children. In the past 50 years, the number of children living with only one parent has almost doubled. We are, in the words of Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia, living in a “de-familied” society.

Just prior to the current Pontifical Council for the Family, Archishop Paglia (who heads that Council) spoke to the National Catholic Register about issues he hoped would be addressed by the bishops at the council. The archbishop spoke of a major shift in our society’s manner of thinking, calling it a “delirium of omnipotence:”

Indeed it as is, today, homo homini Deus (Man is God for man). Now, this is the fundamental knot. Why? Because from this tearing apart and arbitrary rebuilding we are going towards a society “de-familied” and therefore weaker and less solid. [The theologian Richard] Baumann would say liquid. In this context, the one who wins is not “us,” but “I.”

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charity2How much of their incomes do Americans give to charity? A report by Chronicle of Philanthropy that analyzed taxpayers’ IRS data to find the answer:

On average, Americans give about 3 percent of their income to charity each year, according to the report released Monday. But the giving gap between the rich and poor is significant, especially in view of the widening income gap. The report shows those who earned $200,000 or more donated 4.6 percent less of their income between 2006 and 2012; those who earned less than $100,000 gave 4.5 percent more.

Why? Chronicle editor Stacy Palmer noted one factor: church attendance.

The top ten most generous states all have higher than average church attendance rates (and, as the report notes, they are all states that voted for Mitt Romney for president):
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Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
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How the Russian Orthodox Church answers Putin’s prayers in Ukraine
Gabriela Baczynska and Tom Heneghan, Reuters

Under Putin, the ROC gets support from the state and powerful oligarchs allied to the Kremlin, while Moscow benefits from its public blessing. A recent poll showed 75 percent of Russians approve of the ROC and more than half value its close ties with the state.

Why The Nationwide Pension Crisis Is An Opportunity To Reinvigorate Society
Lewis M. Andrews, The Federalist

Citizens and local leaders should use the looming pension crisis in many states and cities to release local governments from centralized control.

Is School Choice Feasible in Rural States?
Lindsey Burke, The Daily Signal

Although states across the country have embraced school choice, rural states have done so more slowly, in part, say some, out of a belief that choice won’t work effectively in those communities.

We refused to tell people in this Bihar village that they need help. It worked wonders
Zubin Sharma, Quartz

In the longer-term, the method we choose affects the community’s self-identity and understanding of their own capacities.

Looking at the numbers is overwhelming. 21 million people trafficked globally every year. Over $150 billion a year in profits. Is there any hope for such a tremendous problem, with so many facets that need attention?

Thankfully, the answer is “yes.” International Justice Mission (IJM) which works to combat all forms of slavery around the globe, is finding success. In just one week, IJM – working with local law enforcement – was able to rescue 17 girls who were being trafficked for sex. This was the result of much hard work: talking and training with local law enforcement, finding follow-up care for survivors, and creating tougher laws regarding trafficking. This short video shows how progress is being made.

Cecilia, now 16, lives in Miami

Cecilia, now 16, lives in Miami

The New York Times has a poignant piece about Cecilia, a young Guatemalan girl who sought a better life in the U.S. and was unfortunately caught up in the machinations of human smuggling. The smugglers were bold, advertising on the radio with promises of a better life. They required a $7,000 loan, with her family’s home as collateral. Her trip ended in a gas station parking lot in Florida, with Cecilia being robbed of another $1,000. Then there is this:

Behind the surge of young migrants showing up for a shot at the American dream is a system of cruel and unregulated capitalism with a proven ability to adapt. The human export industry in the region is now worth billions of dollars, experts say, and it has become more ruthless and sophisticated than ever, employing a growing array of opportunists who trap, rape and rob from the point of departure to the end of the road. [emphasis added]

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