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Audio: Samuel Gregg on Theresa May’s Election Blunder

On Friday afternoon, Acton Institute Director of Programs Samuel Gregg joins guest host Paul Kengor on Ave Maria Radio’s Kresta in the Afternoon to discuss the shocking results of last week’s snap UK elections that saw Theresa May and the Tories lose their majority in the UK Parliament. Continue Reading...

What did Alexis de Tocqueville actually think?

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808 – 1879 ), Alex. Ch. Henri de Tocqueville, 1849, lithograph, Rosenwald Collection Samuel Gregg, research director at the Acton Institute, recently published a review on the new translation of Alexis de Tocqueville’s Recollections: The French Revolution of 1848 and Its Aftermath in which Tocqueville, the “quintessential man of theory,” gets dirty about the politics of the French Revolution. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 06.09.17

Venezuela cardinal says Socialist regime leaves people ‘cruelly repressed’ Inés San Martín, Crux Ahead of a Thursday meeting with Pope Francis as part of the country’s bishops’ conference, one of Venezuela’s cardinals told Crux that the socialist government of President Nicolas Maduro is leaving its people “cruelly repressed” and that any dialogue not aimed at forcing the government to accept new elections is a sham. Continue Reading...
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5 Facts about infrastructure

President Trump has designated this week as “Infrastructure Week,” a time dedicated to “addressing America’s crumbling infrastructure.” Here are five facts you should know about America’s infrastructure. 1. The Federal government has defined infrastructure as the framework of interdependent networks and systems comprising identifiable industries, institutions (including people and procedures), and distribution capabilities that provide a reliable flow of products and services essential to the defense and economic security of the United States, the smooth functioning of governments at all levels, and society as a whole. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 06.08.17

Majority in US Still Say Religion Can Answer Most Problems Art Swift, Gallup A slim majority of Americans (55%) say religion can answer all or most of today’s problems. Although this percentage has declined substantially over time, it has been relatively stable over the past year and a half and is up from the all-time low of 51% in May 2015. Continue Reading...
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