Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, October 9, 2014
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The Empire of Progressive Poverty
Daniel Greenfield, The Sultan Knish blog

Every resource crisis gives the Empire another reason to consolidate control of resources in the name of the public good, and then eliminate access to those resources in the name of the planetary good.

Virgil: Forgotten American Founder
Bradley J. Birzer, The Imaginative Conservative

The American Founders were Men of the West. For all intents and purposes, they might as well have been the remnants of Numenor, each capable of wielding Anduril.

The Minimum Wage Struggle: Bootleggers and Baptists
Adam Smith and Bruce Yandle, The Federalist

In recent weeks, minimum wage workers protesting their low-wage status have marched in the streets in more than 100 U.S. cities. For example, workers in Charleston SC blocked a main thoroughfare, insisting they be paid $15/hr and receive union membership.

Conscience and Community: Understanding the Freedom of Religion
Richard Garnett, Religious Freedom Project

“Religion,” said Justice William Douglas in his Wisconsin v. Yoder (1972) opinion, is “an individual experience.” The opinion was a partial dissent, and this statement is partially correct. But, it does not tell the entire story.

bradleyatCHC“What if we thought about our politics and economics from the person up?” asked Dr. Anthony Bradley in a recent lecture at the Carl F. H. Henry Center for Theological Understanding.

According to Bradley, an associate professor of theology at The King’s College and research fellow of the Acton Institute, conservative Christians continue to isolate themselves because they are allegedly the only ones to “get the gospel right”, while progressives isolate themselves because they are allegedly the only ones who care about justice and changing the world:
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Image source: Marie Claire

Image source: Marie Claire

Marie Claire’s latest feature on inspirational women is misleading.

The article by Elizabeth Griffin is titled “These Remarkable Women Are Fighting ISIS. It’s Time You Know Who They Are” — and the women profiled are indeed remarkable. Even if, like me, you generally oppose women serving in combat roles, you have to admire their courage in fighting the evil that is ISIS.

But what is misleading it the claim that they are women. Of the 13 females in the photo essay, two are young girls. As the feature notes,
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Radio Free ActonOn this week’s edition of Radio Free Acton, Michael Matheson Miller speaks with Ambassador Francis Rooney, who served as U.S. Ambassador to the Holy See from 2005 to 2008 under President George W. Bush. Rooney has a new book out on the Vatican’s role in the world entitled The Global VaticanMiller and Rooney discuss the role of Ambassador, what it’s like to meet the Pope, and focus for a time on Pope Benedict’s Regensburg Address, and the political and diplomatic consequences that flowed from it.

This is part one of their conversation; part two will follow in next week’s edition of Radio Free Acton. To listen to the podcast, use the audio player below.

mike-rowe-life-adviceTelevision personality and former Dirty Jobs host Mike Rowe has become somewhat notorious for penning pointed responses to fans and critics on Facebook, offering routine challenges to prevailing attitudes about work, calling, and vocation.

In his most recent rant, Rowe stays true to form, explaining to a man named “Stephen” why popular vocational directives such as “follow your passion!” make for such terrible advice:

Like all bad advice, “Follow Your Passion” is routinely dispensed as though it’s wisdom were both incontrovertible and equally applicable to all. It’s not. Just because you’re passionate about something doesn’t mean you won’t suck at it. And just because you’re determined to improve doesn’t mean that you will. Does that mean you shouldn’t pursue a thing you’re passionate about?” Of course not. The question is, for how long, and to what end? (more…)

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
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Left, Right, Prudence, Principle, And Catholic Social Doctrine
J. Budziszewski, First Things

A long-running battle between the so-called Catholic left and the so-called Catholic right concerns which political issues the Church should speak about and which ones she shouldn’t.

Why I Want To Live Long And Burden My Children
Cheryl Magness, The Federalist

Ezekiel Emanuel wants to die at 75 because he equates worth with productivity. But burdens help us sacrifice our selfishness for love.

Why you should care about a Muslim inmate’s beard
Emily Hardman, CNN

I’m not a Muslim. I’ve never been imprisoned. And I don’t want to grow a beard. But I’m defending the rights of someone who is and does.

pic_related_100614_LB_BThroughout the history of the church, Christians have been actively involved in the provision and funding of health and medical resources. But for the past 50 years, these functions have been treated as political problems reserved for the state rather than matters to be addressed by the church.

Some Christians, though, are beginning to reassert this biblically mandated role by participating in health care sharing ministries (HCSM). HCSMs are not insurance companies, but nonprofit religious organizations that help members pay for medical treatments. These ministries have primarily been developed and promoted by evangelicals. But earlier this month a Catholic group launched a new HCSM:
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Chuck Chalberg as G.K. Chesterton

Chuck Chalberg as G.K. Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) is considered by many to be one of the most brilliant thinkers of the 20th century. But you’d be hard-pressed to find him discussed in any public high school (or even most colleges or universities, for that matter.) A prolific writer (he penned everything from a popular mystery series to epic ballads), he thought himself mainly a journalist. While he never attended college, his knowledge had both depth and breadth:

Chesterton was equally at ease with literary and social criticism, history, politics, economics, philosophy, and theology. His style is unmistakable, always marked by humility, consistency, paradox, wit, and wonder. His writing remains as timely and as timeless today as when it first appeared, even though much of it was published in throw away papers.

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Me tshirtIn the U.S., about half of adults live alone. Somewhere around 43 percent of kids in America are only children. In the past 50 years, the number of children living with only one parent has almost doubled. We are, in the words of Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia, living in a “de-familied” society.

Just prior to the current Pontifical Council for the Family, Archishop Paglia (who heads that Council) spoke to the National Catholic Register about issues he hoped would be addressed by the bishops at the council. The archbishop spoke of a major shift in our society’s manner of thinking, calling it a “delirium of omnipotence:”

Indeed it as is, today, homo homini Deus (Man is God for man). Now, this is the fundamental knot. Why? Because from this tearing apart and arbitrary rebuilding we are going towards a society “de-familied” and therefore weaker and less solid. [The theologian Richard] Baumann would say liquid. In this context, the one who wins is not “us,” but “I.”

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charity2How much of their incomes do Americans give to charity? A report by Chronicle of Philanthropy that analyzed taxpayers’ IRS data to find the answer:

On average, Americans give about 3 percent of their income to charity each year, according to the report released Monday. But the giving gap between the rich and poor is significant, especially in view of the widening income gap. The report shows those who earned $200,000 or more donated 4.6 percent less of their income between 2006 and 2012; those who earned less than $100,000 gave 4.5 percent more.

Why? Chronicle editor Stacy Palmer noted one factor: church attendance.

The top ten most generous states all have higher than average church attendance rates (and, as the report notes, they are all states that voted for Mitt Romney for president):
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