Latest Posts

The 3 things you need to make ‘socialism’ work

Occasionally, our antagonists think they have discovered the silver bullet argument in favor of “Christian socialism.” One such apology recently came into my inbox. In its entirety, it read: Acts Chapters 4 and 5 Tell of The Holy Spirits Work with The Apostles to Establish SOCIALISM for The Christian Church…What further proof is needed ??? Continue Reading...

Tim Scott’s response to Joe Biden’s address to Congress: 6 quotes

Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina delivered the Republican response to President Joe Biden’s address to a joint session of Congress. Scott’s well-received address traversed the full ground of faith, virtue, and economics – openly declaring that “becoming a Christian transformed my life,” hailing the “the most inclusive economy in my lifetime” under the Trump administration, and stating boldly that “America is not a racist country.” Continue Reading...

Tobit’s biblical theology of work

Tobit is one of the lesser-known books of the Bible – likely in no small part because Protestant Bibles since the nineteenth century commonly omit it. But any Christian, Protestant or otherwise, would benefit from Tobit’s biblical theology of work. Continue Reading...

The economics behind the COVID-19 baby bust

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, some academics predicted a “baby boom,” as couples found themselves locked down with nothing to do. But those familiar with economics knew differently – and the data have now backed us up. Continue Reading...

The fallacy of capitalism’s ‘race to the bottom’

The Biden administration proposes a global minimum tax on corporations to end the “global race to the bottom.” Leaving aside the wisdom of letting France tax U.S.-based corporations, this phrase recalls one of the regnant canards of our time: Capitalism inevitably lowers living standards and grinds people down into poverty. Continue Reading...

Kingdom economics: work and trade as gift-giving

When reflecting on our economic action, we tend to be overly focused on one side of the exchange: our own benefit, our own profit, our own “piece of the pie.” Our consumer-centered culture happily affirms such an emphasis, routinely promoting a zero-sum vision of the economy and self-centered attitudes about vocation, daily work, and economic exchange. Continue Reading...