Acton Institute Powerblog

PowerLinks 10.18.18

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Sears’s ‘radical’ past: How mail-order catalogues subverted the racial hierarchy of Jim Crow
Antonia Noori Farzan, Washington Post

A lesser-known aspect of Sears’s 125-year history, however, is how the company revolutionized rural black Southerners’ shopping patterns in the late 19th century, subverting racial hierarchies by allowing them to make purchases by mail or over the phone and avoid the blatant racism that they faced at small country stores.

Climate Alarmists Admit They Want to Dismantle Our Free Enterprise System
Nicolas Loris, The Daily Signal

Free, competitive energy markets drive innovation and provide the affordable, reliable energy that families and businesses need, and yield a cleaner environment.

Which US state is most corruption-prone? Look away, North Dakota
Max de Haldevang, Quartz

The US public has spent the past two years riveted by high-level corruption scandals and allegations in Washington, DC. They should also be looking closer to home, according to a new report by anti-corruption NGO Coalition for Integrity.

Young Voters Are Warming to Socialism Because They Don’t Know Its History
Annie Holmquist, FEE

If we made this subject a bigger focal point of the education system, would the next generation of voters be more aware and able to discern the pros and cons of socialist government, democratic or not?

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Joe Carter Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

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