Acton Institute Powerblog

A word from the man who inspired Greta Thunberg

As the leader of a Christian think tank in Sweden, Per Ewert watched Greta Thunberg’s global crusade unfold earlier than most of the world. But when he saw her demonstrating outside parliament with her school strike movement, he got a jolt: The book Greta was reading was co-written by … him.

In a new essay for the Acton Institute’s Religion & Liberty Transatlantic website, Ewert writes:

When I think of the school book Greta was reading when it all began, I think about the illustration to the chapter I wrote about influencing society: a photo of an enraged young girl travelling by train to a demonstration at a UN summit. I don’t pretend to be her defining source of inspiration. But still, Greta’s unparalleled one-year-voyage from a lonely seat by the parliament to her current position as the informal leader of a global movement gives me reason to raise a loving warning.

He goes on to share the lessons he believes young activists, and especially her older supporters around the world, should take to heart about environmental stewardship and exercising wise, mature decisionmaking.

Read his important essay here.

Rev. Ben Johnson

Rev. Ben Johnson (@therightswriter) is an Eastern Orthodox priest and served as Executive Editor of the Acton Institute (2016-2021), editing Religion & Liberty, the Powerblog, and its transatlantic website. He has extensively researched the Alt-Right. Previously, he worked for LifeSiteNews and FrontPageMag.com, where he wrote three books including Party of Defeat (with David Horowitz, 2008). His work has appeared at DailyWire.com, National Review, The American Spectator, The Guardian, Daily Caller, National Catholic Register, Spectator USA, FEE Online, RealClear Policy, The Blaze, The Stream, American Greatness, Aleteia, Providence Magazine, Charisma, Jewish World Review, Human Events, Intellectual Takeout, CatholicVote.org, Issues & Insights, The Conservative, Rare.us, and The American Orthodox Institute. His personal websites are therightswriter.com and RevBenJohnson.com. His views are his own.