Acton Institute Powerblog

Acton Line podcast: Liberation theology drives the Amazon synod; Remembering the Berlin Wall

Share this article:
Join the Discussion:

Free weekly Acton Newsletter

On this episode, Acton’s Samuel Gregg joins the podcast to break down liberation theology, a Marxist movement that began in the 20th century and took root in the Catholic Church in Latin America. October 27 marked the close of the Synod of Bishops on the Amazon, a summit organized to foster conversation on ministry and ecological concerns in the Amazon region. But the synod also revealed how, as Gregg says, “liberation theology never really went away.” On the second segment, we take a look at what life was like behind the Iron Curtain. This Saturday, November 9, marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Tom O’Boyle, past correspondent for the Wall Street Journal who covered the events that led up to the fall of the Berlin Wall, comes on to the show to share stories of what he witnessed while he was there.

Check out additional resources for this episode:

He Threw the Pachamama Idols into Tiber River: Dr Taylor Interviews Alexander Tschugguel

Why we threw the Pachamama idols into the Tiber river

Amazon tribal chief: Liberation theology sustains primitive economy

Read “From Marx to Gaia,” by Samuel Gregg

Read “The Berlin Wall and Me: Reflections on the Fall,” by Tom O’Boyle

Check out The Scattered Seeds podcast, hosted by Tom O’Boyle

Recommended books on the Cold War

New to the Acton Line podcast? Subscribe here! We also recommend starting with these episodes:

Do you have feedback for the Acton Line podcast team? We want to hear from you! Email us at Actonline@acton.org. If you like Acton Line, don’t forget to leave a rating and review on the Apple podcast app!

Image credit: Kevin Winter / Staff / Getty Images. Editorial use only.

Enjoy the article?

Click below to view our latest and most popular posts!

Read More

Caroline Roberts Caroline Roberts is a managing editor at the Acton Institute and produces Acton's weekly podcast, Acton Line.

Comments