‘Wealth Isn’t Earned by the Hour’
Acton Institute Powerblog

‘Wealth Isn’t Earned by the Hour’

In an informative interview via Christianity Today’s Money&Faith.net, Dan Miller gives good guidance for people to become entrepreneurs. He’s a big proponent of the side business, which could take as little as 5 hours per week. He says,

Wealth isn’t earned by the hour. It’s made with ideas. We tend to associate income earned with hours worked in the traditional workplace. The person who’s making $8 an hour wants to make $10. The person who’s making $10 wants to make $15. But if they really want to change their financial situation dramatically, it has nothing to do with how many dollars they make per hour. It has to do with how they develop an idea.

But part of what Miller is talking about is the finding of one’s vocation within these side projects. Many people start out with a side business, which they enjoy so much and are so productive doing that the side business becomes their main work. A good part of what Miller does is ask people the right questions, to make them really think about what they want to be doing in life.

Jordan J. Ballor

Jordan J. Ballor (Dr. theol., University of Zurich; Ph.D., Calvin Theological Seminary) is director of research at the Center for Religion, Culture & Democracy, an initiative of the First Liberty Institute. He has previously held research positions at the Acton Institute and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, and has authored multiple books, including a forthcoming introduction to the public theology of Abraham Kuyper. Working with Lexham Press, he served as a general editor for the 12 volume Abraham Kuyper Collected Works in Public Theology series, and his research can be found in publications including Journal of Markets & Morality, Journal of Religion, Scottish Journal of Theology, Reformation & Renaissance Review, Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Faith & Economics, and Calvin Theological Journal. He is also associate director of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research at Calvin Theological Seminary and the Henry Institute for the Study of Christianity & Politics at Calvin University.