PowerLinks 08.19.14
Acton Institute Powerblog

PowerLinks 08.19.14

A Business Catechism
Father John Flynn, LC, Zenit

How to reconcile ethical principles with the exigencies of running a business has long been a cause for debate. A new book looks at this from the perspective of the social teaching of the Catholic Church.

“Men were created to employ themselves”: Calvin on Gen. 2.15
Aaron Denlinger, Reformation21

We tend towards one of two extremes in our attitudes towards work–either we make too little of it, or we make too much of it. We make too little of work when we regard it with contempt, when we treat it as an evil–albeit a necessary one since it supplies the financial resources necessary to pursue the things we actually value (relationships, possessions, status, leisure, etc.).

“The Giver” and the Gift That Keeps on Taking
Anthony Sacramone, Intercollegiate Review

“When people have the freedom to choose, they choose wrong. Every single time.” So says the Chief Elder, a firm believer in the Reformed doctrine of total depravity, apparently.

The Curse of Calling and Myth of Creativity
Grady Powell, Fare Forward

The word “calling” has the power to elicit eyerolls and sighs – a cliché of the worst kind. Though it stirs up deep desires to commit to a higher purpose and raises hopes for divine guidance, it also awakens the profound confusion within our culture and the church around personal identity and the meaning of a good life.

Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).