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EcoLinks 07.29.15

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How C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien responded to ‘environmental holocaust’
Joseph Loconte, CNN

In his controversial encyclical on climate change, Pope Francis delivered a scathing critique of environmental degradation and called for “an ecological conversion” among fellow Christians. A century earlier, however, another environmental debate prompted its own version of soul-searching among the faithful.

Climate encyclical is religious, not political, document
John Malrett, Des Moines Register

Referring to the encyclical on climate change, Leonard Pitts (“Pope Should Stick To Religion?” July 22) focuses on what he calls Pope Francis’ “bare-knuckles critique of the excesses of capitalism,” ignoring the excesses of politics, ecology, science, technology and relativism which the pope also addresses. It should be obvious to Pitts when Pope Francis writes, “On many concrete questions, the Church has no reason to offer a definitive opinion; she knows that honest debate must be encouraged among experts, while respecting divergent views,” this is not a political document requiring specific solutions to specific problems.

Climate Change And The Impact Of Laudato Si
ValueWalk

Last week, the Vatican held a meeting of the mayors of some of the world’s largest cities to discuss climate change. This meeting was part of Pope Francis’s efforts to add to the discussion of climate change, which was the subject of a recent encyclical, Laudato Si. In this report, we will begin with our position on climate change, discuss the encyclical and try to measure its potential impact on the direction of climate change policy. As always, we will conclude with market ramifications.

Interfaith leaders support papal encyclical on environment
Oliver Uyttebrouck, Albuquerque Journal

Catholics, Protestants and Muslims joined Tuesday in support of Pope Francis’ encyclical on the environment and signed a letter calling on New Mexico civic leaders to address climate change, environmental degradation and poverty. The letter – signed by 92 clergy and lay members – calls for New Mexicans to support a scathing communique from Pope Francis in June, in which he warned that the planet is “beginning to look like an immense pile of filth,” and drew a connection between climate, pollution and poverty.

Climate Change This Week: Carbon Caps Help, Religions Agree, and More!
Mary Ellen Harte, Huffington Post

Muslims and Christians Agree: Climate Change Poses Dire Threat – an Islamic declaration joins Pope Francis’ encyclical in pressuring world leaders on an ever increasing global threat.

How to Survive Climate Change the Best Possible Way
Robyn Purchia, Planetsave

What do a government scientist, reverend, fisherman, and farmer all have in common? As Pope Francis wrote in his environmental encyclical, “Praised Be,” they all share a common home. And, as floods, droughts, heat waves, and storms hurt their home with increasing frequency and severity, they all share a common desire to survive and prosper.

Pope decrees full Carbon Price
Gideon Polya, MWC News

A full Carbon Price (Carbon Tax) on greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution is required to stop GHG pollution that is killing the Biosphere and threatening Humanity. Pope Francis in his 2015 Encyclical Letter “Laudato si” demands that a “fully borne” Carbon Price be emplaced on greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution in order to prevent “millions of premature deaths”.

In Bangladesh, coastal villagers pay price for climate change
Stephen Uttom, Satkhira and Rock Ronald Rozario, UCA News

Pope Francis’s encyclical, Laudato si’, articulated the dangers posed by climate change and implored the world to care for the environment. Climate scientists believe the low-lying country is one of the world’s most vulnerable to climate change.

Pope Francis’ Trip to the U.S: What is expected? Cardinal Wuerl weighs in
Cardinal Donald Wuerl, Rome Reports

Cardinal Donald Wuerl is the Archbishop of Washington D.C. Even though there’s no denying the Pope’s popularity, he will have to face some thorny issues in America. From divisions on the issue of gay marriage, to the Pope’s encyclical on climate change. Then there’s also the tension between the White House and the American Conference of Catholic bishops over religious liberty.

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Bruce Edward Walker has more than 30 years’ writing and editing experience in a variety of publishing areas, including reference books, newspapers, magazines, media relations and corporate speeches. Much of this material involved research on water rights, land use, alternative-technology vehicles and other environmental issues, but Walker has also written extensively on nonscientific subjects, having produced six titles in Wiley Publishing’s CliffsNotes series, including study guides for "Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland" and "One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest." He has also authored more than 100 critical biographies of authors and musicians for Gale Research's Contemporary Literary Criticism and Contemporary Musicians reference-book series. He was managing editor of The Heartland Institute's InfoTech & Telecom News from 2010-2012. Prior to that, he was manager of communications for the Mackinac Center's Property Rights Network. He also served from 2006-2011 as editor of Michigan Science, a quarterly Mackinac Center publication. Walker has served as an adjunct professor of literature and academic writing at University of Detroit Mercy. For the past five years, he has authored a weekly column for the mid-Michigan Morning Sun newspaper. Walker holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Michigan State University. He is the father of two daughters and currently lives in Flint, Mich., with his wife Katherine.

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