PowerLinks 08.19.15
Acton Institute Powerblog

PowerLinks 08.19.15

Minimum-wage offensive could speed arrival of robot-powered restaurants
Lydia DePillis, Washington Post

About 30 percent of the restaurant industry’s costs come from salaries, so burger-flipping robots — or at least super-fast ovens that expedite the process — become that much more cost-competitive if the current federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour is doubled.

The Economic Way of Asking Questions
Don Boudreaux, Cafe Hayek

Of all the physical, or non-social, sciences, biology is the science that is most like economics: central to both biology and to economics is the quest to understand the logic of undesigned order, and to interpret observed real-world phenomena in light of that understanding.

Authority, Citizenship, And Public Justice
David T. Koyzis, First Things

North Americans famously esteem freedom but are ambivalent about authority. Authority strikes many of us as too constricting and insufficiently supportive of our desires and aspirations. Yet I believe that authority is key to understanding our humanity and the meaning of our creation in God’s image.

Why erratic schedules are one of the worst parts of low-wage work
Timothy B. Lee, Vox

A recent management trend has made the lives of low-wage workers even more difficult. In an effort to save on labor costs, many employers have made employees’ schedules more erratic and less predictable.

Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).