Dylan Pahman

Dylan Pahman is a research fellow at the Acton Institute, where he serves as managing editor of the Journal of Markets & Morality. He earned his MTS in Historical Theology from Calvin Theological Seminary. In addition to his work as an editor, Dylan has authored several peer-reviewed articles, conference papers, essays, and one book: Foundations of a Free & Virtuous Society (Acton Institute, 2017). He has also lectured on a wide variety of topics, including Orthodox Christian social thought, the history of Christian monastic enterprise, the Reformed statesman and theologian Abraham Kuyper, and academic publishing, among others.

Posts by Dylan Pahman

Call for papers: the legacy of Abraham Kuyper — 100 years later

The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the death of Dutch theologian, statesman, educator, churchman, editorialist, and social theorist Abraham Kuyper. To commemorate his life and legacy, the Journal of Markets & Morality is accepting submissions on the theme of Abraham Kuyper for the Fall 2020 issue, guest edited by Reformed scholars Robert Joustra and Jessica Joustra of Redeemer University College in Canada. Continue Reading...

The #YangGang has a $3 trillion problem

Entrepreneur Andrew Yang is running for president as a Democrat. Yang has made a Universal Basic Income (UBI) of $1,000/month to all American adults the centerpiece of his campaign. While Yang doesn’t show up in any polls, he has a growing internet following that can be found under the hashtag #YangGang (not to be confused with Chinese politician Yang Gang). Continue Reading...

Don’t write off young ‘socialists’

In his State of the Union address this year, president Trump warned of the dangers of socialism. But is there any substance to that worry? Rep. Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), a self-declared socialist, has made headlines with her Green New Deal proposal. Continue Reading...

Who are ‘our poor’ in the immigration debate?

At First Things last week, in his essay “Our Poor,” economist Andrew M. Yuengert reflected upon his 2004 Acton monograph Inhabiting the Land, questioning whether his economic analysis (that immigration is a net gain for both immigrants and natives) needs more nuance in the light of our current political climate: Continue Reading...